Zebrafish response to 3D printed shoals of conspecifics: The effect of body size

Tiziana Bartolini, Violet Mwaffo, Ashleigh Showler, Simone Macrì, Sachit Butail, Maurizio Porfiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent progress in three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has enabled rapid prototyping of complex models at a limited cost. Virtually every research laboratory has access to a 3D printer, which can assist in the design and implementation of hypothesis-driven studies on animal behavior. In this study, we explore the possibility of using 3D printing technology to understand the role of body size in the social behavior of the zebrafish model organism. In a dichotomous preference test, we study the behavioral response of zebrafish to shoals of 3D printed replicas of varying size. We systematically vary the size of each replica without altering the coloration, aspect ratio, and stripe patterns, which are all selected to closely mimic zebrafish morphophysiology. The replicas are actuated through a robotic manipulator, mimicking the natural motion of live subjects. Zebrafish preference is assessed by scoring the time spent in the vicinity of the shoal of replicas, and the information theoretic construct of transfer entropy is used to further elucidate the influence of the replicas on zebrafish motion. Our results demonstrate that zebrafish adjust their behavior in response to variations in the size of the replicas. Subjects exhibit an avoidance reaction for larger replicas, and they are attracted toward and influenced by smaller replicas. The approach presented in this study, integrating 3D printing technology, robotics, and information theory, is expected to significantly aid preclinical research on zebrafish behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number026003
JournalBioinspiration and Biomimetics
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2016

Fingerprint

Body Size
Zebrafish
Printing
Robotics
3D printers
Information theory
Rapid prototyping
Research laboratories
Manipulators
Technology
Aspect ratio
Animals
Entropy
Information Theory
Animal Behavior
Social Behavior
Costs
Research
Three Dimensional Printing
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • 3D printed replica
  • body length
  • fish shoaling
  • transfer entropy
  • zebrafish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Biotechnology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Zebrafish response to 3D printed shoals of conspecifics : The effect of body size. / Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Showler, Ashleigh; Macrì, Simone; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio.

In: Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, Vol. 11, No. 2, 026003, 18.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bartolini, Tiziana ; Mwaffo, Violet ; Showler, Ashleigh ; Macrì, Simone ; Butail, Sachit ; Porfiri, Maurizio. / Zebrafish response to 3D printed shoals of conspecifics : The effect of body size. In: Bioinspiration and Biomimetics. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 2.
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