Young Children Police Group Members at Personal Cost

Daniel A. Yudkin, Jay Van Bavel, Marjorie Rhodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Humans' evolutionary success has depended in part on their willingness to punish, at personal cost, bad actors who have not harmed them directly-a behavior known as costly third-party punishment. The present studies examined the psychological processes underlying this behavior from a developmental perspective, using a novel, naturalistic method. In these studies (ages 3-6, total N = 225), participants of all ages enacted costly punishment, and rates of punishment increased with age. In addition, younger children (ages 3-4), when in a position of authority, were more likely to punish members of their own group, whereas older children (ages 5-6) showed no group- or authority-based differences. These findings demonstrate the developmental emergence of costly punishment, and show how a sense of authority can foster the kind of group-regulatory behavior that costly punishment may have evolved to serve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: General
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Punishment
Police
Costs and Cost Analysis
Psychology

Keywords

  • Cooperation
  • Development
  • Fairness
  • Reputation
  • Third-party punishment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Young Children Police Group Members at Personal Cost. / Yudkin, Daniel A.; Van Bavel, Jay; Rhodes, Marjorie.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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