Young adult non-smokers' exposure to real-world tobacco marketing: Results of an ecological momentary assessment pilot study

Shyanika W. Rose, Andrew Anesetti-Rothermel, Hoda Elmasry, Ray Niaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The aims of this pilot study were to assess and characterize non-current smoking young adults' exposure to tobacco marketing through an ecological momentary assessment protocol. Methods: Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) consists of repeated measurement of momentary phenomena and is well-suited to capture sporadic experiences in the real-world, such as exposure to tobacco marketing. EMA has the potential to capture detailed information about real-world marketing exposures in ways that reduce recall bias and increase ecological validity. In this study, young adults (n = 31; ages 18-25) responded to random prompts regarding their momentary exposure to tobacco marketing via text messages on their smartphones for 14 days (n = 1798 observations). Unadjusted and adjusted analyses were conducted using multilevel logistic regression to assess the odds of exposure accounting for correlation of multiple repeated measures within individuals while controlling for variability between individuals. Results: Respondents reported, on average, two momentary exposures to tobacco advertising in the 14-day study period. In adjusted analyses, African-American (aOR 3.36; 95% CI 1.07, 10.54) and Hispanic respondents (aOR 5.08; 95% CI 1.28, 20.13) were more likely to report exposure to tobacco advertising. Respondents were also more likely to report exposure when also exposed to others using tobacco products and when they were at stores compared with at home (aOR 14.82; 95% CI 3.61, 60.88). Conclusion: Non-smoking young adults report exposure to tobacco marketing particularly at the point-of-sale, with the highest likelihood of exposure among African-American and Hispanic young people. EMA protocols can be effective in assessing the potential impact of point-of-sale tobacco marketing on young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number435
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2017

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Keywords

  • District of Columbia
  • Health equity
  • Marketing
  • Pilot projects
  • Tobacco
  • Young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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