Written parental consent in school-based HIV/AIDS prevention research

Catherine Mathews, Sally J. Guttmacher, Alan J. Flisher, Yolisa Mtshizana, Andiswa Hani, Merrick Zwarenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the process of obtaining "active," written parental consent for a school-based HIV/AIDS prevention project in a South African high school by investigating (1) parental consent form return rates, (2) parents' recall and knowledge of the research, and (3) the extent to which this consent procedure represented parents' wishes about their child's involvement in the research. Methods. This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised interviews with parents of children in grades eight and nine in a poor, periurban settlement in Cape Town. Results. Within 2 weeks, 94% of 258 parents responded to a letter requesting written consent and of those, 93% consented, but subsequent interviews showed that 65% remembered seeing the consent form. At the end of the interview, 99% consented to their child's participation. Conclusions. These findings challenge many of the assumptions underlying active written parental consent. However, they should not be used to deny adolescents at high risk of HIV infection the opportunity to participate in prevention trials. Rather, researchers together with the communities in which the research is undertaken need to decide on appropriate informed consent strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1266-1269
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume95
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Parental Consent
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Parents
HIV
Consent Forms
Interviews
Research
Informed Consent
HIV Infections
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Written parental consent in school-based HIV/AIDS prevention research. / Mathews, Catherine; Guttmacher, Sally J.; Flisher, Alan J.; Mtshizana, Yolisa; Hani, Andiswa; Zwarenstein, Merrick.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 95, No. 7, 07.2005, p. 1266-1269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathews, C, Guttmacher, SJ, Flisher, AJ, Mtshizana, Y, Hani, A & Zwarenstein, M 2005, 'Written parental consent in school-based HIV/AIDS prevention research', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 95, no. 7, pp. 1266-1269. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2004.037788
Mathews, Catherine ; Guttmacher, Sally J. ; Flisher, Alan J. ; Mtshizana, Yolisa ; Hani, Andiswa ; Zwarenstein, Merrick. / Written parental consent in school-based HIV/AIDS prevention research. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 ; Vol. 95, No. 7. pp. 1266-1269.
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