Workplace discrimination predicting racial/ethnic socialization across African American, Latino, and Chinese families

Carolin Hagelskamp, Diane L. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Informed by Kohn and Schooler's (1969) occupational socialization framework, this study examined linkages between racial/ethnic minority mothers' perceptions of racial/ethnic discrimination in the workplace and adolescents' accounts of racial/ethnic socialization in the home. Data were collected from 100 mother- early adolescent dyads who participated in a longitudinal study of urban adolescents' development in the Northeastern United States, including African American, Latino, and Chinese families. Mothers and adolescents completed surveys separately. We found that when mothers reported more frequent institutional discrimination at work, adolescents reported more frequent preparation for bias messages at home, across racial/ethnic groups. Mothers' experiences of interpersonal prejudice at work were associated with more frequent cultural socialization messages among African American and Latino families. Chinese youth reported fewer cultural socialization messages when mothers perceived more frequent interpersonal prejudice at work. Findings are discussed in the context of minority groups' distinct social histories and economic status in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-560
Number of pages11
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Racism
Socialization
Hispanic Americans
Workplace
African Americans
socialization
racism
workplace
Mothers
adolescent
prejudice
discrimination
occupational socialization
Urban Renewal
Adolescent Development
Minority Groups
New England
social history
Ethnic Groups
dyad

Keywords

  • Early adolescence
  • Occupational socialization
  • Racial/ethnic discrimination
  • Racial/ethnic socialization
  • Work-family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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