Working nonstandard schedules and variable shifts in low-income families: Associations with parental psychological well-being, family functioning, and child well-being.

Joann Hsueh, Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Longitudinal data from the New Hope Project-an experimental evaluation of a work-based antipoverty program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin-was used to explore concurrent and lagged associations of nonstandard schedules and variable shifts with parental psychological well-being, regularity of family mealtimes, and child well-being among low-income families. Working a combination of variable shifts and nonstandard hours was associated concurrently with lower teacher-reported school performance and engagement and higher levels of externalizing behavior problems. Fixed nonstandard schedules were associated with lagged decreases in parent-reported school performance, whereas working variable shifts was associated with lagged increases in parent-reported school performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)620-632
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

child well-being
Child Welfare
Appointments and Schedules
Hope
low income
well-being
Psychology
parents
school
performance
Meals
regularity
teacher
evaluation
School Teachers
Problem Behavior

Keywords

  • Behavior problems
  • Child well being
  • Family functioning
  • Low-income families
  • Parental psychological well being
  • Parental work schedules
  • School performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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