Working class conservatism: a system justification perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Working class conservatism is a perennial issue in social science, but researchers have struggled to provide an adequate characterization. In social psychology, the question has too often been framed in ‘either/or’ terms of whether the disadvantaged are more or less likely to support the status quo than the advantaged. This is a crude rendering of the issue obscuring the fact that even if most working class voters are not conservative, millions are — and conservatives could not win elections without their support. System justification theory highlights epistemic, existential, and relational needs to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord that are shared by everyone — and that promote conservative attitudes. I summarize qualitative and quantitative evidence of system justification among the disadvantaged and consider prospects for more constructive political activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-78
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Vulnerable Populations
Politics
Social Psychology
Social Sciences
Uncertainty
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Working class conservatism : a system justification perspective. / Jost, John.

In: Current Opinion in Psychology, Vol. 18, 01.12.2017, p. 73-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{09aa7b70639047b4abd8fb2d8a10e588,
title = "Working class conservatism: a system justification perspective",
abstract = "Working class conservatism is a perennial issue in social science, but researchers have struggled to provide an adequate characterization. In social psychology, the question has too often been framed in ‘either/or’ terms of whether the disadvantaged are more or less likely to support the status quo than the advantaged. This is a crude rendering of the issue obscuring the fact that even if most working class voters are not conservative, millions are — and conservatives could not win elections without their support. System justification theory highlights epistemic, existential, and relational needs to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord that are shared by everyone — and that promote conservative attitudes. I summarize qualitative and quantitative evidence of system justification among the disadvantaged and consider prospects for more constructive political activity.",
author = "John Jost",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.08.020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "73--78",
journal = "Current Opinion in Psychology",
issn = "2352-250X",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Working class conservatism

T2 - a system justification perspective

AU - Jost, John

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Working class conservatism is a perennial issue in social science, but researchers have struggled to provide an adequate characterization. In social psychology, the question has too often been framed in ‘either/or’ terms of whether the disadvantaged are more or less likely to support the status quo than the advantaged. This is a crude rendering of the issue obscuring the fact that even if most working class voters are not conservative, millions are — and conservatives could not win elections without their support. System justification theory highlights epistemic, existential, and relational needs to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord that are shared by everyone — and that promote conservative attitudes. I summarize qualitative and quantitative evidence of system justification among the disadvantaged and consider prospects for more constructive political activity.

AB - Working class conservatism is a perennial issue in social science, but researchers have struggled to provide an adequate characterization. In social psychology, the question has too often been framed in ‘either/or’ terms of whether the disadvantaged are more or less likely to support the status quo than the advantaged. This is a crude rendering of the issue obscuring the fact that even if most working class voters are not conservative, millions are — and conservatives could not win elections without their support. System justification theory highlights epistemic, existential, and relational needs to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord that are shared by everyone — and that promote conservative attitudes. I summarize qualitative and quantitative evidence of system justification among the disadvantaged and consider prospects for more constructive political activity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027973418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027973418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.08.020

DO - 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.08.020

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28843724

AN - SCOPUS:85027973418

VL - 18

SP - 73

EP - 78

JO - Current Opinion in Psychology

JF - Current Opinion in Psychology

SN - 2352-250X

ER -