Work environment factors other than staffing associated with nurses' ratings of patient care quality

Maja Djukic, Christine Kovner, Carol S. Brewer, Farida K. Fatehi, Daniel D. Cline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: The impact of registered nurse (RN) staffing on patient care quality has been extensively studied. Identifying additional modifiable work environment factors linked to patient care quality is critical as the projected shortage of approximately 250,000 RNs over the next 15 years will limit institutions' ability to rely on RN staffing alone to ensure high-quality care. PURPOSE:: We examined the association between RNs' ratings of patient care quality and several novel work environment factors adjusting for the effects of two staffing variables: reported patient-to-RN ratios and ratings of staffing adequacy. METHODOLOGY:: We used a cross-sectional, correlational design and a mailed survey to collect data in 2009 from a national sample of RNs (n = 1,439) in the United States. A multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the data. FINDINGS:: Workgroup cohesion, nurse-physician relations, procedural justice, organizational constraints, and physical work environment were associated with RNs' ratings of quality, adjusting for staffing. Furthermore, employment in a Magnet hospital and job satisfaction were positively related to ratings of quality, whereas supervisory support was not. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:: Our evidence demonstrates the importance of considering RN work environment factors other than staffing when planning improvements in patient care quality. Health care managers can use the results of our study to strategically allocate resources toward work environment factors that have the potential to improve quality of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-114
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Care Management Review
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Patient Care
Nurses
Quality of Health Care
Physician-Nurse Relations
Aptitude
Magnets
Job Satisfaction
Social Justice
Logistic Models
Work environment
Staffing
Factors
Patient care
Rating
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • nurse staffing
  • nurse work environment
  • nursing practice environment
  • patient care quality
  • work environment redesign

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Leadership and Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Work environment factors other than staffing associated with nurses' ratings of patient care quality. / Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine; Brewer, Carol S.; Fatehi, Farida K.; Cline, Daniel D.

In: Health Care Management Review, Vol. 38, No. 2, 04.2013, p. 105-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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