Women's employment among blacks, whites, and three groups of latinas do more privileged women have higher employment?

Paula England, Carmen Garcia-Beaulieu, Mary Ross

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    During much of U.S. history, Black women had higher employment rates than white women. But by the late twentieth century, women in more privileged racial/ethnic, national origin, and education groups were more likely to work for pay. The authors compare the employment of white women to Blacks and three groups of Latinas - Mexicans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans-and explain racial/ethnic group differences. White women work for pay more weeks per year than Latinas or Black women, although the gaps are small for all groups but Mexicans. In all groups, education encourages and children reduce employment. Having a husband does not reduce employment, and husbands' earnings have little effect. The higher fertility of Mexicans and the large number of recent immigrants among Mexican women reduce their employment relative to that of white women. The higher education of white women explains large shares of the employment gap with each group of women of color because, in today's labor market, education strongly predicts employment.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)494-509
    Number of pages16
    JournalGender and Society
    Volume18
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 2004

    Fingerprint

    women's employment
    Group
    group education
    husband
    Latinas
    women's work
    fertility
    education
    ethnic group
    twentieth century
    labor market
    immigrant

    Keywords

    • Labor force participation
    • Latinas
    • Women of color
    • Women's employment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Gender Studies

    Cite this

    Women's employment among blacks, whites, and three groups of latinas do more privileged women have higher employment? / England, Paula; Garcia-Beaulieu, Carmen; Ross, Mary.

    In: Gender and Society, Vol. 18, No. 4, 08.2004, p. 494-509.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    England, Paula ; Garcia-Beaulieu, Carmen ; Ross, Mary. / Women's employment among blacks, whites, and three groups of latinas do more privileged women have higher employment?. In: Gender and Society. 2004 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 494-509.
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