Why model?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This lecture treats some enduring misconceptions about modeling. One of these is that the goal is always prediction. The lecture distinguishes between explanation and prediction as modeling goals, and offers sixteen reasons other than prediction to build a model. It also challenges the common assumption that scientific theories arise from and 'summarize' data, when often, theories precede and guide data collection; without theory, in other words, it is not clear what data to collect. Among other things, it also argues that the modeling enterprise enforces habits of mind essential to freedom. It is based on the author's 2008 Bastille Day keynote address to the Second World Congress on Social Simulation, George Mason University, and earlier addresses at the Institute of Medicine, the University of Michigan, and the Santa Fe Institute.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJASSS
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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Medicine
habits
medicine
simulation
Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Epstein, J. (2008). Why model? JASSS, 11(4).

Why model? / Epstein, Joshua.

In: JASSS, Vol. 11, No. 4, 10.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Epstein, J 2008, 'Why model?', JASSS, vol. 11, no. 4.
Epstein J. Why model? JASSS. 2008 Oct;11(4).
Epstein, Joshua. / Why model?. In: JASSS. 2008 ; Vol. 11, No. 4.
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