When Similarity Is a Liability

Effects of Sex-Based Preferential Selection on Reactions to Like-Sex and Different-Sex Others

Madeline E. Heilman, Stella R. Kaplow, M. A G Amato, Peter Stathatos

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Abstract

In 2 laboratory studies, 145 male and female undergraduates were selected for the role of manager either on the basis of merit or preferentially on the basis of their sex. Results of the first study indicated that when female subjects had been selected preferentially as compared with on a merit basis, they reacted more negatively to female (but not to male) applicants for an entry-level position in terms of personnel evaluations and competence ratings and they recommended female applicants for hire less frequently and less enthusiastically. No differences in personnel evaluations were found as a result of preferential selection when subjects were male (Study 1) or when subjects were provided with favorable information about their ability (Study 2). Implications for implementation of affirmative action programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-927
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume78
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1993

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When Similarity Is a Liability : Effects of Sex-Based Preferential Selection on Reactions to Like-Sex and Different-Sex Others. / Heilman, Madeline E.; Kaplow, Stella R.; Amato, M. A G; Stathatos, Peter.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 78, No. 6, 12.1993, p. 917-927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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