When Mona Lisa smiled and love was in the air: On the cognitive energetics of motivated judgments

Jocelyn Belanger, Arie W. Kruglanski, Xiaoyan Chen, Edward Orehek, David J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We describe two experiments on the determinants of motivated judgments. They explored the conjoint effects of three factors: (1) dominant judgmental motivation (geared toward accuracy or directional bias), (2) task demands, and (3) the availability of cognitive resources. We find that where a directional motivation is dominant and task demands are high (making biasing difficult), the presence (vs. absence) of resources promotes wishful judgments. Conversely, where accuracy motivation is dominant and wishful judgments are the default, resources reduce the likelihood of their occurrence. Finally, where a directional motivation is dominant and task demands are low (making biasing easy), or where the accuracy motivation is dominant and task demands are high, resources have relatively minor effects on bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-119
Number of pages16
JournalSocial Cognition
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Love
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

When Mona Lisa smiled and love was in the air : On the cognitive energetics of motivated judgments. / Belanger, Jocelyn; Kruglanski, Arie W.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Orehek, Edward; Johnson, David J.

In: Social Cognition, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 104-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belanger, Jocelyn ; Kruglanski, Arie W. ; Chen, Xiaoyan ; Orehek, Edward ; Johnson, David J. / When Mona Lisa smiled and love was in the air : On the cognitive energetics of motivated judgments. In: Social Cognition. 2015 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 104-119.
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