When goal sharing produces support that is not caring

Heather Barry Kappes, Patrick Shrout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Four studies used experimental and correlational methods to investigate the effect of a "partner-achievement goal," or a personal goal for a relationship partner's successful achievement. This goal led support providers to offer unhelpful support about how to play a computer game (Study 1). It also predicted poor achievement for dieting support recipients (Study 2). The effects of partner-achievement goals were moderated by recipient expectations of success and mediated by recipient effort. Recipients with low expectations of their own success requested that their provider partners with partner-achievement goals refrain from offering them support (Study 3); they also invested less time studying Latin grammar and learned fewer Latin words over one week (Study 4). Together, these findings highlight the unique behavioral consequences of partner-achievement goals for both members of a relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-673
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Keywords

  • achievement
  • goals
  • partners
  • relationships
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

When goal sharing produces support that is not caring. / Kappes, Heather Barry; Shrout, Patrick.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 37, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 662-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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