What makes an annular mode "annular"?

Edwin Gerber, David W J Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Annular patterns with a high degree of zonal symmetry play a prominent role in the natural variability of the atmospheric circulation and its response to external forcing. But despite their apparent importance for understanding climate variability, the processes that give rise to their marked zonally symmetric components remain largely unclear. Here the authors use simple stochastic models in conjunction with an atmospheric model and observational analyses to explore the conditions under which annular patterns arise from empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of the flow. The results indicate that annular patterns arise not only from zonally coherent fluctuations in the circulation (i.e., "dynamical annularity") but also from zonally symmetric statistics of the circulation in the absence of zonally coherent fluctuations (i.e., "statistical annularity"). It is argued that the distinction between dynamical and statistical annular patterns derived from EOF analysis can be inferred from the associated variance spectrum: larger differences in the variance explained by an annular EOF and successive EOFs generally indicate underlying dynamical annularity. The authors provide a simple recipe for assessing the conditions that give rise to annular EOFs of the circulation. When applied to numerical models, the recipe indicates dynamical annularity in parameter regimes with strong feedbacks between eddies and the mean flow. When applied to observations, the recipe indicates that annular EOFs generally derive from statistical annularity of the flow in the midlatitude troposphere but from dynamical annularity in both the stratosphere and the mid-high-latitude Southern Hemisphere troposphere.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-332
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

troposphere
atmospheric circulation
Southern Hemisphere
stratosphere
symmetry
eddy
climate
empirical orthogonal function analysis
atmospheric model
statistics
parameter

Keywords

  • Annular mode
  • Empirical orthogonal functions
  • General circulation models
  • Intraseasonal variability
  • Stochastic models
  • Storm tracks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

What makes an annular mode "annular"? / Gerber, Edwin; Thompson, David W J.

In: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 74, No. 2, 2017, p. 317-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gerber, Edwin ; Thompson, David W J. / What makes an annular mode "annular"?. In: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 74, No. 2. pp. 317-332.
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