What lies beneath? An evaluation of lower molar trigonid crest patterns based on both dentine and enamel expression

Shara Bailey, Matthew M. Skinner, Jean Jacques Hublin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The nearly ubiquitous presence of a continuous crest connecting the protoconid and metaconid of the lower molars (often referred to as the middle trigonid crest), is one of several dental traits that distinguish Homo neanderthalensis from Homo sapiens. This study examined variation in trigonid crest patterns on the enamel and dentine surfaces to (1) evaluate the concordance between the morphology of trigonid crests at the inner dentine and the outer enamel surfaces; (2) examine their developmental origin(s); and (3) examine trait polarity through comparison with Australopithecus africanus and Pan. The sample included 73 H. neanderthalensis, 67 contemporary H. sapiens, 5 A. africanus, and 24 Pan lower molars. Results indicate general agreement in the morphology observed on the dentine and enamel surfaces. All but one H. neanderthalensis molar shows some trigonid crest development, whereas trigonid crests occur in low frequency in contemporary humans. Pan and A. africanus both also show high frequencies of a continuous trigonid crest. However, the origin of the trigonid crest differs among groups. H. neanderthalensis uniquely possesses a 'middle' trigonid crest that originates from the mesial accessory ridge of one or both cusps. Based on our results we suggest that presence of a continuous middle trigonid crest at the dentine surface is primitive and the lack of any trigonid crest is derived. Genetic drift may explain the high frequency of trigonid crests in H.neanderthalensis. However, H. neanderthalensis still appears to be derived relative to Pan and A. africanus in its high frequency of the mesial-mesial trigonid crest configuration.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)505-518
    Number of pages14
    JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
    Volume145
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 2011

    Fingerprint

    Neanderthals
    Dentin
    Dental Enamel
    evaluation
    lack
    Genetic Drift
    Group
    Tooth

    Keywords

    • Australopithecus
    • discrete dental traits
    • H. neanderthalensis
    • H. sapiens
    • microCT
    • middle trigonid crest
    • modern humans
    • Neandertals
    • Pan

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Anatomy
    • Anthropology

    Cite this

    What lies beneath? An evaluation of lower molar trigonid crest patterns based on both dentine and enamel expression. / Bailey, Shara; Skinner, Matthew M.; Hublin, Jean Jacques.

    In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 145, No. 4, 08.2011, p. 505-518.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bailey, Shara ; Skinner, Matthew M. ; Hublin, Jean Jacques. / What lies beneath? An evaluation of lower molar trigonid crest patterns based on both dentine and enamel expression. In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 2011 ; Vol. 145, No. 4. pp. 505-518.
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