What is political science? What should it be?

Bertell Ollman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This paper examines the five myths that govern political science: that it studies politics; that it is scientific; that one can study politics cut off from the other social sciences and history; that the state is neutral; and that the bulk of the work in the discipline furthers the cause of democracy. Within political science, there have been three main approaches to criticizing these myths: a moderate one that treats the elements in these myths as more or less disconnected; a radical one that sees a systemic connection between these elements; and a Marxist one that names this system "Capitalism" and privileges the role of the capitalist state in explaining both politics and political science.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)553-562
    Number of pages10
    JournalNew Political Science
    Volume22
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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    political science
    myth
    politics
    social history
    privilege
    capitalist society
    social science
    democracy
    cause

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    What is political science? What should it be? / Ollman, Bertell.

    In: New Political Science, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 553-562.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ollman, Bertell. / What is political science? What should it be?. In: New Political Science. 2000 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 553-562.
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