What i think you think of me

Women's reactions to being viewed as beneficiaries of preferential selection

Madeline Heilman, Victoria Barocas Alcott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Undergraduate women (N = 150) participated in 2 experimental studies designed to examine the effects of knowing that another believed they were beneficiaries of preferential selection. Results indicated that participants' awareness that the other viewed them as having been selected on the basis of gender rather than merit (a) prompted inferences that the other held negative expectations of their competence (Studies 1 and 2); (b) produced timid, performance-limiting task decisions as well as negative self-regard when they were uncertain about their task ability level (Studies 1 and 2); and (c) produced ambitious, performance-maximizing task decisions when they knew themselves to be high in task ability and also were motivated to make a good impression (Study 2). In addition, in both studies negative affect resulted from the participants' knowledge that the other viewed them as having been preferentially selected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-582
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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What i think you think of me : Women's reactions to being viewed as beneficiaries of preferential selection. / Heilman, Madeline; Alcott, Victoria Barocas.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 86, No. 4, 01.01.2001, p. 574-582.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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