What developmental disorders can tell us about the nature and origins of language

Gary Marcus, Hugh Rabagliati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few areas in the cognitive sciences evoke more controversy than language evolution, due in part to the difficulty in gathering relevant empirical data. The study of developmental disorders is well placed to provide important new clues, but has been hampered by a lack of consensus on the aims and interpretation of the research project. We suggest that the application of the Darwinian principle of 'descent with modification' can help to reconcile much apparently inconsistent data. We close by illustrating how systematic analyses within and between disorders, suitably informed by evolutionary theory - and ideally facilitated by the creation of an open-access database - could provide new insights into language evolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1226-1229
Number of pages4
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

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What developmental disorders can tell us about the nature and origins of language. / Marcus, Gary; Rabagliati, Hugh.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 9, No. 10, 10.2006, p. 1226-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marcus, Gary ; Rabagliati, Hugh. / What developmental disorders can tell us about the nature and origins of language. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 10. pp. 1226-1229.
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