What can individual differences tell us about the specialization of function?

Cristina D. Rabaglia, Gary F. Marcus, Sean P. Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Can the study of individual differences inform debates about modularity and the specialization of function? In this article, we consider the implications of a highly replicated, robust finding known as positive manifold: Individual differences in different cognitive domains tend to be positively intercorrelated. Prima facie, this fact, which has generally been interpreted as reflecting the influence of a domain-general cognitive factor, might be seen as posing a serious challenge to a strong view of modularity. Drawing on a mixture of meta-analysis and computer simulation, we show that positive manifold derives instead largely from between-task neural overlap, suggesting a potential way of reconciling individual differences with some form of modularity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-303
Number of pages16
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume28
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Individuality
Computer Simulation
Meta-Analysis
Individual Differences
Modularity
Overlap
Meta-analysis

Keywords

  • Cognitive architecture
  • Functional specialization
  • Individual differences
  • Positive manifold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

What can individual differences tell us about the specialization of function? / Rabaglia, Cristina D.; Marcus, Gary F.; Lane, Sean P.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychology, Vol. 28, No. 3-4, 06.2011, p. 288-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rabaglia, Cristina D. ; Marcus, Gary F. ; Lane, Sean P. / What can individual differences tell us about the specialization of function?. In: Cognitive Neuropsychology. 2011 ; Vol. 28, No. 3-4. pp. 288-303.
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