Walking the tightrope between feeling good and being accurate

Mood as a resource in processing persuasive messages

Rajagopal Raghunathan, Yaacov Trope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three studies investigated the influence of mood states on the processing of positive and negative information regarding caffeine consumption and on the impact of this information on one's mood, attitudes, and intentions. The results were consistent with the predictions of the mood-as-a-resource hypothesis: First, the induction of positive mood in high (compared with low) caffeine consumers enhanced recall of negative information about caffeine consumption. Second, processing information about caffeine consumption undermined the positive mood of high (but not low) caffeine consumers. Third, the induction of positive mood enhanced the impact of negative information about caffeine on high (compared with low) caffeine consumers' attitudes and intentions toward caffeine consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)510-525
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Caffeine
mood
Walking
Emotions
resources
induction
information processing
Automatic Data Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Walking the tightrope between feeling good and being accurate : Mood as a resource in processing persuasive messages. / Raghunathan, Rajagopal; Trope, Yaacov.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 510-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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