Visual field map clusters in human frontoparietal cortex

Wayne E. Mackey, Jonathan Winawer, Clayton Curtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The visual neurosciences have made enormous progress in recent decades, in part because of the ability to drive visual areas by their sensory inputs, allowing researchers to define visual areas reliably across individuals and across species. Similar strategies for parcellating higher-order cortex have proven elusive. Here, using a novel experimental task and nonlinear population receptive field modeling, we map and characterize the topographic organization of several regions in human frontoparietal cortex. We discover representations of both polar angle and eccentricity that are organized into clusters, similar to visual cortex, where multiple gradients of polar angle of the contralateral visual field share a confluent fovea. This is striking because neural activity in frontoparietal cortex is believed to reflect higher-order cognitive functions rather than external sensory processing. Perhaps the spatial topography in frontoparietal cortex parallels the retinotopic organization of sensory cortex to enable an efficient interface between perception and higher-order cognitive processes. Critically, these visual maps constitute well-defined anatomical units that future studies of frontoparietal cortex can reliably target.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere22974
JournaleLife
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 2017

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Aptitude
Visual Cortex
Neurosciences
Visual Fields
Cognition
Research Personnel
Topography
Population
Processing
Drive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Visual field map clusters in human frontoparietal cortex. / Mackey, Wayne E.; Winawer, Jonathan; Curtis, Clayton.

In: eLife, Vol. 6, e22974, 19.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mackey, Wayne E. ; Winawer, Jonathan ; Curtis, Clayton. / Visual field map clusters in human frontoparietal cortex. In: eLife. 2017 ; Vol. 6.
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