Viewing Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Through a Developmental Lens

What We Know and What We Need to Know

Anil Chacko, Lauren Wakschlag, Carri Hill, Barbara Danis, Kimberly Andrews Espy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Empirical investigation into disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in early childhood has expanded considerably during the past decade. Although there have been considerable gains in the understanding of the presentation and course of these psychiatric disorders in early childhood, the lack of a developmental framework to guide nosologic issues likely impedes progress in this area. The authors propose that enhanced developmental sensitivity in defining symptoms of DBDs and ADHD may shed light on outstanding issues in the field. In particular, developmental specification may enhance specificity, sensitivity, and stability of DBDs and ADHD symptoms as well as inform our understanding of which type of treatment works best for whom. This article provides an overview of these critical issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)627-643
Number of pages17
JournalChild and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

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Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Lenses
Psychiatry
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Disruptive behavior
  • Nosology
  • Preschool
  • Psychopathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Viewing Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Through a Developmental Lens : What We Know and What We Need to Know. / Chacko, Anil; Wakschlag, Lauren; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Espy, Kimberly Andrews.

In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 18, No. 3, 07.2009, p. 627-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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