Value added and its uses

Where you stand depends on where you sit

Sean Corcoran, Dan Goldhaber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this policy brief we argue that there is little debate about the statistical properties of value-added model (VAM) estimates of teacher performance, yet, despite this, there is little consensus about what the evidence about VAMs implies for their practical utility as part of high-stakes performance evaluation systems. A review of the evidence base that underlies the debate over VAM measures, followed by our subjective opinions about the value of using VAMs, illustrates how different policy conclusions can easily arise even given a high-level general agreement about an existing body of evidence. We conclude the brief by offering a few thoughts about the limits of our knowledge and what that means for those who do wish to integrate VAMs into their own teacher-evaluation strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)418-434
Number of pages17
JournalEducation Finance and Policy
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

value added
evidence
teacher
evaluation
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Value added and its uses : Where you stand depends on where you sit. / Corcoran, Sean; Goldhaber, Dan.

In: Education Finance and Policy, Vol. 8, No. 3, 07.2013, p. 418-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{18d29a71c8eb44549373397242fb7d4d,
title = "Value added and its uses: Where you stand depends on where you sit",
abstract = "In this policy brief we argue that there is little debate about the statistical properties of value-added model (VAM) estimates of teacher performance, yet, despite this, there is little consensus about what the evidence about VAMs implies for their practical utility as part of high-stakes performance evaluation systems. A review of the evidence base that underlies the debate over VAM measures, followed by our subjective opinions about the value of using VAMs, illustrates how different policy conclusions can easily arise even given a high-level general agreement about an existing body of evidence. We conclude the brief by offering a few thoughts about the limits of our knowledge and what that means for those who do wish to integrate VAMs into their own teacher-evaluation strategy.",
author = "Sean Corcoran and Dan Goldhaber",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1162/EDFP_a_00104",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "418--434",
journal = "Education Finance and Policy",
issn = "1557-3060",
publisher = "MIT Press Journals",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Value added and its uses

T2 - Where you stand depends on where you sit

AU - Corcoran, Sean

AU - Goldhaber, Dan

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - In this policy brief we argue that there is little debate about the statistical properties of value-added model (VAM) estimates of teacher performance, yet, despite this, there is little consensus about what the evidence about VAMs implies for their practical utility as part of high-stakes performance evaluation systems. A review of the evidence base that underlies the debate over VAM measures, followed by our subjective opinions about the value of using VAMs, illustrates how different policy conclusions can easily arise even given a high-level general agreement about an existing body of evidence. We conclude the brief by offering a few thoughts about the limits of our knowledge and what that means for those who do wish to integrate VAMs into their own teacher-evaluation strategy.

AB - In this policy brief we argue that there is little debate about the statistical properties of value-added model (VAM) estimates of teacher performance, yet, despite this, there is little consensus about what the evidence about VAMs implies for their practical utility as part of high-stakes performance evaluation systems. A review of the evidence base that underlies the debate over VAM measures, followed by our subjective opinions about the value of using VAMs, illustrates how different policy conclusions can easily arise even given a high-level general agreement about an existing body of evidence. We conclude the brief by offering a few thoughts about the limits of our knowledge and what that means for those who do wish to integrate VAMs into their own teacher-evaluation strategy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879927254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879927254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1162/EDFP_a_00104

DO - 10.1162/EDFP_a_00104

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 418

EP - 434

JO - Education Finance and Policy

JF - Education Finance and Policy

SN - 1557-3060

IS - 3

ER -