Validity of low-resolution eye-tracking to assess eye movements during a rapid number naming task: performance of the eyetribe eye tracker

Jenelle Raynowska, John Ross Rizzo, Janet C. Rucker, Weiwei Dai, Joel Birkemeier, Julian Hershowitz, Ivan Selesnick, Laura J. Balcer, Steven L. Galetta, Todd Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the performance of the EyeTribe compared to the EyeLink for eye movement recordings during a rapid number naming test in healthy control participants. Background: With the increasing accessibility of portable, economical, video-based eye trackers such as the EyeTribe, there is growing interest in these devices for eye movement recordings, particularly in the domain of sports-related concussion. However, prior to implementation there is a primary need to establish the validity of these devices. One current limitation of portable eye trackers is their sampling rate (30–60 samples per second, or Hz), which is typically well below the benchmarks achieved by their research-grade counterparts (e.g., the EyeLink, which samples at 500–2000 Hz). Methods: We compared video-oculographic measurements made using the EyeTribe with those of the EyeLink during a digitized rapid number naming task (the King-Devick test) in a convenience sample of 30 controls. Results: EyeTribe had loss of signal during recording, and failed to reproduce the typical shape of saccadic main sequence relationships. In addition, EyeTribe data yielded significantly fewer detectable saccades and displayed greater variance of inter-saccadic intervals than the EyeLink system. Conclusion: Caution is advised prior to implementation of low-resolution eye trackers for objective saccade assessment and sideline concussion screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-208
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Injury
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 28 2018

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Eye Movements
Saccades
Benchmarking
Equipment and Supplies
Sports
Healthy Volunteers
Research
Naming Task

Keywords

  • Concussion
  • eye movement measurements
  • eye movements
  • king-devick
  • rapid number naming
  • saccades
  • video oculography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Validity of low-resolution eye-tracking to assess eye movements during a rapid number naming task : performance of the eyetribe eye tracker. / Raynowska, Jenelle; Rizzo, John Ross; Rucker, Janet C.; Dai, Weiwei; Birkemeier, Joel; Hershowitz, Julian; Selesnick, Ivan; Balcer, Laura J.; Galetta, Steven L.; Hudson, Todd.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 32, No. 2, 28.01.2018, p. 200-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raynowska, J, Rizzo, JR, Rucker, JC, Dai, W, Birkemeier, J, Hershowitz, J, Selesnick, I, Balcer, LJ, Galetta, SL & Hudson, T 2018, 'Validity of low-resolution eye-tracking to assess eye movements during a rapid number naming task: performance of the eyetribe eye tracker', Brain Injury, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 200-208. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2017.1374469
Raynowska, Jenelle ; Rizzo, John Ross ; Rucker, Janet C. ; Dai, Weiwei ; Birkemeier, Joel ; Hershowitz, Julian ; Selesnick, Ivan ; Balcer, Laura J. ; Galetta, Steven L. ; Hudson, Todd. / Validity of low-resolution eye-tracking to assess eye movements during a rapid number naming task : performance of the eyetribe eye tracker. In: Brain Injury. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 200-208.
@article{46231b5642374377b4057821222448ad,
title = "Validity of low-resolution eye-tracking to assess eye movements during a rapid number naming task: performance of the eyetribe eye tracker",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the performance of the EyeTribe compared to the EyeLink for eye movement recordings during a rapid number naming test in healthy control participants. Background: With the increasing accessibility of portable, economical, video-based eye trackers such as the EyeTribe, there is growing interest in these devices for eye movement recordings, particularly in the domain of sports-related concussion. However, prior to implementation there is a primary need to establish the validity of these devices. One current limitation of portable eye trackers is their sampling rate (30–60 samples per second, or Hz), which is typically well below the benchmarks achieved by their research-grade counterparts (e.g., the EyeLink, which samples at 500–2000 Hz). Methods: We compared video-oculographic measurements made using the EyeTribe with those of the EyeLink during a digitized rapid number naming task (the King-Devick test) in a convenience sample of 30 controls. Results: EyeTribe had loss of signal during recording, and failed to reproduce the typical shape of saccadic main sequence relationships. In addition, EyeTribe data yielded significantly fewer detectable saccades and displayed greater variance of inter-saccadic intervals than the EyeLink system. Conclusion: Caution is advised prior to implementation of low-resolution eye trackers for objective saccade assessment and sideline concussion screening.",
keywords = "Concussion, eye movement measurements, eye movements, king-devick, rapid number naming, saccades, video oculography",
author = "Jenelle Raynowska and Rizzo, {John Ross} and Rucker, {Janet C.} and Weiwei Dai and Joel Birkemeier and Julian Hershowitz and Ivan Selesnick and Balcer, {Laura J.} and Galetta, {Steven L.} and Todd Hudson",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1080/02699052.2017.1374469",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "200--208",
journal = "Brain Injury",
issn = "0269-9052",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validity of low-resolution eye-tracking to assess eye movements during a rapid number naming task

T2 - performance of the eyetribe eye tracker

AU - Raynowska, Jenelle

AU - Rizzo, John Ross

AU - Rucker, Janet C.

AU - Dai, Weiwei

AU - Birkemeier, Joel

AU - Hershowitz, Julian

AU - Selesnick, Ivan

AU - Balcer, Laura J.

AU - Galetta, Steven L.

AU - Hudson, Todd

PY - 2018/1/28

Y1 - 2018/1/28

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the performance of the EyeTribe compared to the EyeLink for eye movement recordings during a rapid number naming test in healthy control participants. Background: With the increasing accessibility of portable, economical, video-based eye trackers such as the EyeTribe, there is growing interest in these devices for eye movement recordings, particularly in the domain of sports-related concussion. However, prior to implementation there is a primary need to establish the validity of these devices. One current limitation of portable eye trackers is their sampling rate (30–60 samples per second, or Hz), which is typically well below the benchmarks achieved by their research-grade counterparts (e.g., the EyeLink, which samples at 500–2000 Hz). Methods: We compared video-oculographic measurements made using the EyeTribe with those of the EyeLink during a digitized rapid number naming task (the King-Devick test) in a convenience sample of 30 controls. Results: EyeTribe had loss of signal during recording, and failed to reproduce the typical shape of saccadic main sequence relationships. In addition, EyeTribe data yielded significantly fewer detectable saccades and displayed greater variance of inter-saccadic intervals than the EyeLink system. Conclusion: Caution is advised prior to implementation of low-resolution eye trackers for objective saccade assessment and sideline concussion screening.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the performance of the EyeTribe compared to the EyeLink for eye movement recordings during a rapid number naming test in healthy control participants. Background: With the increasing accessibility of portable, economical, video-based eye trackers such as the EyeTribe, there is growing interest in these devices for eye movement recordings, particularly in the domain of sports-related concussion. However, prior to implementation there is a primary need to establish the validity of these devices. One current limitation of portable eye trackers is their sampling rate (30–60 samples per second, or Hz), which is typically well below the benchmarks achieved by their research-grade counterparts (e.g., the EyeLink, which samples at 500–2000 Hz). Methods: We compared video-oculographic measurements made using the EyeTribe with those of the EyeLink during a digitized rapid number naming task (the King-Devick test) in a convenience sample of 30 controls. Results: EyeTribe had loss of signal during recording, and failed to reproduce the typical shape of saccadic main sequence relationships. In addition, EyeTribe data yielded significantly fewer detectable saccades and displayed greater variance of inter-saccadic intervals than the EyeLink system. Conclusion: Caution is advised prior to implementation of low-resolution eye trackers for objective saccade assessment and sideline concussion screening.

KW - Concussion

KW - eye movement measurements

KW - eye movements

KW - king-devick

KW - rapid number naming

KW - saccades

KW - video oculography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038015046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038015046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02699052.2017.1374469

DO - 10.1080/02699052.2017.1374469

M3 - Article

C2 - 29211506

AN - SCOPUS:85038015046

VL - 32

SP - 200

EP - 208

JO - Brain Injury

JF - Brain Injury

SN - 0269-9052

IS - 2

ER -