Valence asymmetries in the human amygdala: Task relevance modulates amygdala responses to positive more than negative affective cues

Paul E. Stillman, Jay Van Bavel, William A. Cunningham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Organisms must constantly balance appetitive needs with vigilance for potential threats. Recent research suggests that the amygdala may play an important role in both of these goals. Although the amygdala plays a role in processing motivationally relevant stimuli that are positive or negative, negative information often appears to carry greater weight. From a functional perspective, this may reflect the fact that threatening stimuli generally require action, whereas appetitive stimuli can often be safely ignored. In this study, we examine whether amygdala activation to positive stimuli may be more sensitive to task goals than negative stimuli, which are often related to self-preservation concerns. During fMRI, participants were presented with two images that varied on valence and extremity and were instructed to focus on one of the images. Results indicated that negative stimuli elicited greater amygdala activity regardless of task relevance. In contrast, positive stimuli only led to a relative increase in amygdala activity when they were task relevant. This suggests that the amygdala may be more responsive to negative stimuli regardless of their relevance to immediate goals, whereas positive stimuli may only elicit amygdala activity when they are relevant to the perceivers’ goals. This pattern of valence asymmetry in the human amygdala may help balance approach-related goal pursuit with chronic self-preservation goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-851
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 6 2015

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Amygdala
asymmetry
Cues
stimulus
Valence
Affective
Asymmetry
Stimulus
activation
Extremities
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Weights and Measures
threat
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Valence asymmetries in the human amygdala : Task relevance modulates amygdala responses to positive more than negative affective cues. / Stillman, Paul E.; Van Bavel, Jay; Cunningham, William A.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 27, No. 4, 06.04.2015, p. 842-851.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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