Utilization of an Animated Electronic Health Video to Increase Knowledge of Post- and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Among African American Women: Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey

Keosha T Bond, S Raquel Ramos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite renewed focus on biomedical prevention strategies since the publication of several clinical trials highlighting the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), knowledge of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) and PrEP continues to remain scarce among women, especially among African American women who are disproportionally affected by HIV. In an effort to address this barrier and encourage uptake of PEP and PrEP, an electronic health (eHealth) video was created using an entertainment-education format.

OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preference of an avatar-led, eHealth video, PEP and PrEP for Women, to increase awareness and knowledge of PEP and PrEP for HIV in a sample of African American women.

METHODS: A cross-sectional, Web-based study was conducted with 116 African American women aged 18 to 61 years to measure participants' perceived acceptability of the video on a 5-point scale: poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. Backward stepwise regression was used to the find the outcome variable of a higher rating of the PEP and PrEP for Women video. Thematic analysis was conducted to explore the reasons for recommending the video to others after watching the eHealth video.

RESULTS: Overall, 89% of the participants rated the video as good or higher. A higher rating of the educational video was significantly predicted by: no current use of drugs/alcohol (beta=-.814; P=.004), not having unprotected sex in the last 3 months (beta=-.488; P=.03), higher income (beta=.149; P=.03), lower level of education (beta=-.267; P=.005), and lower exposure to sexual assault since the age of 18 years (beta=-.313; P=.004). After watching the eHealth video, reasons for recommending the video included the video being educational, entertaining, and suitable for women.

CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of an avatar-led eHealth video fostered education about PEP and PrEP among African American women who have experienced insufficient outreach for biomedical HIV strategies. This approach can be leveraged to increase awareness and usage among African American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e9995
JournalJMIR formative research
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 29 2019

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Post-Exposure Prophylaxis
African Americans
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV
Health
Education
Unsafe Sex
Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis
Publications
Alcohols
Clinical Trials

Cite this

@article{39e507c4f82943a9ac5dfe3d643623c7,
title = "Utilization of an Animated Electronic Health Video to Increase Knowledge of Post- and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Among African American Women: Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Despite renewed focus on biomedical prevention strategies since the publication of several clinical trials highlighting the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), knowledge of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) and PrEP continues to remain scarce among women, especially among African American women who are disproportionally affected by HIV. In an effort to address this barrier and encourage uptake of PEP and PrEP, an electronic health (eHealth) video was created using an entertainment-education format.OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preference of an avatar-led, eHealth video, PEP and PrEP for Women, to increase awareness and knowledge of PEP and PrEP for HIV in a sample of African American women.METHODS: A cross-sectional, Web-based study was conducted with 116 African American women aged 18 to 61 years to measure participants' perceived acceptability of the video on a 5-point scale: poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. Backward stepwise regression was used to the find the outcome variable of a higher rating of the PEP and PrEP for Women video. Thematic analysis was conducted to explore the reasons for recommending the video to others after watching the eHealth video.RESULTS: Overall, 89{\%} of the participants rated the video as good or higher. A higher rating of the educational video was significantly predicted by: no current use of drugs/alcohol (beta=-.814; P=.004), not having unprotected sex in the last 3 months (beta=-.488; P=.03), higher income (beta=.149; P=.03), lower level of education (beta=-.267; P=.005), and lower exposure to sexual assault since the age of 18 years (beta=-.313; P=.004). After watching the eHealth video, reasons for recommending the video included the video being educational, entertaining, and suitable for women.CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of an avatar-led eHealth video fostered education about PEP and PrEP among African American women who have experienced insufficient outreach for biomedical HIV strategies. This approach can be leveraged to increase awareness and usage among African American women.",
author = "Bond, {Keosha T} and Ramos, {S Raquel}",
note = "{\circledC}Keosha T Bond, S Raquel Ramos. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (http://formative.jmir.org), 29.05.2019.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "29",
doi = "10.2196/formative.9995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "e9995",
journal = "JMIR formative research",
issn = "2561-326X",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utilization of an Animated Electronic Health Video to Increase Knowledge of Post- and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Among African American Women

T2 - Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey

AU - Bond, Keosha T

AU - Ramos, S Raquel

N1 - ©Keosha T Bond, S Raquel Ramos. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (http://formative.jmir.org), 29.05.2019.

PY - 2019/5/29

Y1 - 2019/5/29

N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite renewed focus on biomedical prevention strategies since the publication of several clinical trials highlighting the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), knowledge of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) and PrEP continues to remain scarce among women, especially among African American women who are disproportionally affected by HIV. In an effort to address this barrier and encourage uptake of PEP and PrEP, an electronic health (eHealth) video was created using an entertainment-education format.OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preference of an avatar-led, eHealth video, PEP and PrEP for Women, to increase awareness and knowledge of PEP and PrEP for HIV in a sample of African American women.METHODS: A cross-sectional, Web-based study was conducted with 116 African American women aged 18 to 61 years to measure participants' perceived acceptability of the video on a 5-point scale: poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. Backward stepwise regression was used to the find the outcome variable of a higher rating of the PEP and PrEP for Women video. Thematic analysis was conducted to explore the reasons for recommending the video to others after watching the eHealth video.RESULTS: Overall, 89% of the participants rated the video as good or higher. A higher rating of the educational video was significantly predicted by: no current use of drugs/alcohol (beta=-.814; P=.004), not having unprotected sex in the last 3 months (beta=-.488; P=.03), higher income (beta=.149; P=.03), lower level of education (beta=-.267; P=.005), and lower exposure to sexual assault since the age of 18 years (beta=-.313; P=.004). After watching the eHealth video, reasons for recommending the video included the video being educational, entertaining, and suitable for women.CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of an avatar-led eHealth video fostered education about PEP and PrEP among African American women who have experienced insufficient outreach for biomedical HIV strategies. This approach can be leveraged to increase awareness and usage among African American women.

AB - BACKGROUND: Despite renewed focus on biomedical prevention strategies since the publication of several clinical trials highlighting the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), knowledge of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) and PrEP continues to remain scarce among women, especially among African American women who are disproportionally affected by HIV. In an effort to address this barrier and encourage uptake of PEP and PrEP, an electronic health (eHealth) video was created using an entertainment-education format.OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preference of an avatar-led, eHealth video, PEP and PrEP for Women, to increase awareness and knowledge of PEP and PrEP for HIV in a sample of African American women.METHODS: A cross-sectional, Web-based study was conducted with 116 African American women aged 18 to 61 years to measure participants' perceived acceptability of the video on a 5-point scale: poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. Backward stepwise regression was used to the find the outcome variable of a higher rating of the PEP and PrEP for Women video. Thematic analysis was conducted to explore the reasons for recommending the video to others after watching the eHealth video.RESULTS: Overall, 89% of the participants rated the video as good or higher. A higher rating of the educational video was significantly predicted by: no current use of drugs/alcohol (beta=-.814; P=.004), not having unprotected sex in the last 3 months (beta=-.488; P=.03), higher income (beta=.149; P=.03), lower level of education (beta=-.267; P=.005), and lower exposure to sexual assault since the age of 18 years (beta=-.313; P=.004). After watching the eHealth video, reasons for recommending the video included the video being educational, entertaining, and suitable for women.CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of an avatar-led eHealth video fostered education about PEP and PrEP among African American women who have experienced insufficient outreach for biomedical HIV strategies. This approach can be leveraged to increase awareness and usage among African American women.

U2 - 10.2196/formative.9995

DO - 10.2196/formative.9995

M3 - Article

C2 - 31144667

VL - 3

SP - e9995

JO - JMIR formative research

JF - JMIR formative research

SN - 2561-326X

IS - 2

ER -