Using random telephone sampling to recruit generalizable samples for family violence studies

Amy M Smith Slep, Richard E. Heyman, Mathew C. Williams, Cheryl E. Van Dyke, Susan G. O'Leary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Convenience sampling methods predominate in recruiting for laboratory-based studies within clinical and family psychology. The authors used random digit dialing (RDD) to determine whether they could feasibly recruit generalizable samples for 2 studies (a parenting study and an intimate partner violence study). RDD screen response rate was 42-45%; demographics matched those in the 2000 U.S. Census, with small- to medium-sized differences on race, age, and income variables. RDD respondents who qualified for, but did not participate in, the laboratory study of parents showed small differences on income, couple conflicts, and corporal punishment. Time and cost are detailed, suggesting that RDD may be a feasible, effective method by which to recruit more generalizable samples for in-laboratory studies of family violence when those studies have sufficient resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)680-689
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

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Domestic Violence
Telephone
Clinical Psychology
Punishment
Parenting
Censuses
Parents
Demography
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Family violence
  • Generalizability
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Random digit dialing
  • Sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Using random telephone sampling to recruit generalizable samples for family violence studies. / Slep, Amy M Smith; Heyman, Richard E.; Williams, Mathew C.; Van Dyke, Cheryl E.; O'Leary, Susan G.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 20, No. 4, 12.2006, p. 680-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slep, Amy M Smith ; Heyman, Richard E. ; Williams, Mathew C. ; Van Dyke, Cheryl E. ; O'Leary, Susan G. / Using random telephone sampling to recruit generalizable samples for family violence studies. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 680-689.
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