Using culture-centered qualitative formative research to design broadcast messages for HIV prevention for African American adolescents

Jennifer R. Horner, Daniel Romer, Peter A. Vanable, Laura F. Salazar, Michael P. Carey, Ivan Juzang, Thierry Fortune, Ralph DiClemente, Naomi Farber, Bonita Stanton, Robert F. Valois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The need for formative research in designing mass media health-education messages is widely accepted; however, distinct methodologies for developing such messages are less well documented. This article describes a culture-centered approach for developing messages to promote sexual risk reduction in urban African American adolescents. The method uses qualitative formative research to identify "competing narratives" that support healthy behavior despite the dominance of messages that favor risk-taking behavior. The method is illustrated using qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with 124 adolescents. Analysis focuses on two barriers to sexual risk reduction: (a) social pressure for early initiation of sexual intercourse and (b) perceptions that condoms reduce sexual pleasure. We demonstrate how competing narratives identified in the analysis can be featured in radio and television messages advocating healthy behavior by modeling risk-reducing negotiation skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-325
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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Qualitative Research
broadcast
African Americans
qualitative research
Research Design
HIV
Risk Reduction Behavior
adolescent
Mass Media
Pleasure
Coitus
Television
Negotiating
Condoms
Risk-Taking
Radio
Health Education
narrative
mass media
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Using culture-centered qualitative formative research to design broadcast messages for HIV prevention for African American adolescents. / Horner, Jennifer R.; Romer, Daniel; Vanable, Peter A.; Salazar, Laura F.; Carey, Michael P.; Juzang, Ivan; Fortune, Thierry; DiClemente, Ralph; Farber, Naomi; Stanton, Bonita; Valois, Robert F.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.06.2008, p. 309-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horner, JR, Romer, D, Vanable, PA, Salazar, LF, Carey, MP, Juzang, I, Fortune, T, DiClemente, R, Farber, N, Stanton, B & Valois, RF 2008, 'Using culture-centered qualitative formative research to design broadcast messages for HIV prevention for African American adolescents', Journal of Health Communication, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 309-325. https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730802063215
Horner, Jennifer R. ; Romer, Daniel ; Vanable, Peter A. ; Salazar, Laura F. ; Carey, Michael P. ; Juzang, Ivan ; Fortune, Thierry ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Farber, Naomi ; Stanton, Bonita ; Valois, Robert F. / Using culture-centered qualitative formative research to design broadcast messages for HIV prevention for African American adolescents. In: Journal of Health Communication. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 309-325.
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