User interfaces for tangible characters

Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives?

Natalie Freed, Winslow Burleson, Hayes Raffle, Rafael Ballagas, Naomi Newman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

What if children's make-believe characters could keep in touch when the children were apart? We propose a novel concept for children's use of technology through imagination play: user interfaces designed to be used by children's character toys rather than directly by the children ("doll-computer interfaces"). We apply this model to the challenge of remote communication for children with an enhanced dollhouse containing small-scale interfaces for the dolls with a variety of fully functional multimodal communication functions. Using this interface as a technology probe, we explore a variety of design decisions with remote pairs of children. Our preliminary results suggest that toy-perspective and manipulable toy elements are particularly helpful in supporting play and successful use of communication technologies, while the "true-to-life" toy aspects are sensitive to individual frames of reference and more flexible interfaces that still fit within the toy context lead to creative communication strategies. We found that different communication channels offered interesting tradeoffs between uninterrupted play and rich verbal description. We also learned that the concept appeals to a wide age range but that the youngest children may need additional scaffolding for successful remote play.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
Pages69-78
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC2010 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: Jun 9 2010Jun 12 2010

Other

Other9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC2010
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period6/9/106/12/10

Fingerprint

User interfaces
Communication
Interfaces (computer)

Keywords

  • Children
  • Doll-computer interfaces
  • Remote play
  • Storytelling
  • Tangible interfaces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Freed, N., Burleson, W., Raffle, H., Ballagas, R., & Newman, N. (2010). User interfaces for tangible characters: Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives? In Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (pp. 69-78) https://doi.org/10.1145/1810543.1810552

User interfaces for tangible characters : Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives? / Freed, Natalie; Burleson, Winslow; Raffle, Hayes; Ballagas, Rafael; Newman, Naomi.

Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. 2010. p. 69-78.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Freed, N, Burleson, W, Raffle, H, Ballagas, R & Newman, N 2010, User interfaces for tangible characters: Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives? in Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. pp. 69-78, 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC2010, Barcelona, Spain, 6/9/10. https://doi.org/10.1145/1810543.1810552
Freed N, Burleson W, Raffle H, Ballagas R, Newman N. User interfaces for tangible characters: Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives? In Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. 2010. p. 69-78 https://doi.org/10.1145/1810543.1810552
Freed, Natalie ; Burleson, Winslow ; Raffle, Hayes ; Ballagas, Rafael ; Newman, Naomi. / User interfaces for tangible characters : Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives?. Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. 2010. pp. 69-78
@inproceedings{c9cc4d3732ff4e4cb5f7074944e6787b,
title = "User interfaces for tangible characters: Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives?",
abstract = "What if children's make-believe characters could keep in touch when the children were apart? We propose a novel concept for children's use of technology through imagination play: user interfaces designed to be used by children's character toys rather than directly by the children ({"}doll-computer interfaces{"}). We apply this model to the challenge of remote communication for children with an enhanced dollhouse containing small-scale interfaces for the dolls with a variety of fully functional multimodal communication functions. Using this interface as a technology probe, we explore a variety of design decisions with remote pairs of children. Our preliminary results suggest that toy-perspective and manipulable toy elements are particularly helpful in supporting play and successful use of communication technologies, while the {"}true-to-life{"} toy aspects are sensitive to individual frames of reference and more flexible interfaces that still fit within the toy context lead to creative communication strategies. We found that different communication channels offered interesting tradeoffs between uninterrupted play and rich verbal description. We also learned that the concept appeals to a wide age range but that the youngest children may need additional scaffolding for successful remote play.",
keywords = "Children, Doll-computer interfaces, Remote play, Storytelling, Tangible interfaces",
author = "Natalie Freed and Winslow Burleson and Hayes Raffle and Rafael Ballagas and Naomi Newman",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1145/1810543.1810552",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781605589510",
pages = "69--78",
booktitle = "Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - User interfaces for tangible characters

T2 - Can children connect remotely through toy perspectives?

AU - Freed, Natalie

AU - Burleson, Winslow

AU - Raffle, Hayes

AU - Ballagas, Rafael

AU - Newman, Naomi

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - What if children's make-believe characters could keep in touch when the children were apart? We propose a novel concept for children's use of technology through imagination play: user interfaces designed to be used by children's character toys rather than directly by the children ("doll-computer interfaces"). We apply this model to the challenge of remote communication for children with an enhanced dollhouse containing small-scale interfaces for the dolls with a variety of fully functional multimodal communication functions. Using this interface as a technology probe, we explore a variety of design decisions with remote pairs of children. Our preliminary results suggest that toy-perspective and manipulable toy elements are particularly helpful in supporting play and successful use of communication technologies, while the "true-to-life" toy aspects are sensitive to individual frames of reference and more flexible interfaces that still fit within the toy context lead to creative communication strategies. We found that different communication channels offered interesting tradeoffs between uninterrupted play and rich verbal description. We also learned that the concept appeals to a wide age range but that the youngest children may need additional scaffolding for successful remote play.

AB - What if children's make-believe characters could keep in touch when the children were apart? We propose a novel concept for children's use of technology through imagination play: user interfaces designed to be used by children's character toys rather than directly by the children ("doll-computer interfaces"). We apply this model to the challenge of remote communication for children with an enhanced dollhouse containing small-scale interfaces for the dolls with a variety of fully functional multimodal communication functions. Using this interface as a technology probe, we explore a variety of design decisions with remote pairs of children. Our preliminary results suggest that toy-perspective and manipulable toy elements are particularly helpful in supporting play and successful use of communication technologies, while the "true-to-life" toy aspects are sensitive to individual frames of reference and more flexible interfaces that still fit within the toy context lead to creative communication strategies. We found that different communication channels offered interesting tradeoffs between uninterrupted play and rich verbal description. We also learned that the concept appeals to a wide age range but that the youngest children may need additional scaffolding for successful remote play.

KW - Children

KW - Doll-computer interfaces

KW - Remote play

KW - Storytelling

KW - Tangible interfaces

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954908695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954908695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/1810543.1810552

DO - 10.1145/1810543.1810552

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781605589510

SP - 69

EP - 78

BT - Proceedings of IDC2010: The 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children

ER -