Use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique in inheritance studies of Plasmodium falciparum

Janet Howard, Jane M R Carlton, David Walliker, James B. Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Effectiveness of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), a technique using 1 10-base primer to amplify random segments of genomic DNA, and some of its possible uses were tested in the A + T-rich genome of Plasmodium falciparum. The best concentrations of MgCl2, 60% G+C primer, and DNA were determined to be 4.0 mM, 0.4 μM, and 90-180 ng/15 μl reaction, respectively. Use of 30% G+C primers did not allow amplification to occur. Application of RAPD to DNA of parent and progeny clones from a P. falciparum cross showed that polymorphisms identified in the parentals and tracked in the progeny were inherited in a Mendelian fashion and that RAPD-identified polymorphisms could be used as genetic markers. Some of these polymorphic markers were located on more than 1 chromosome, whereas others were specific for a single chromosome. Two of these markers, each located on chromosome 3 of 1 of the parental parasites, were missing from 2 of the 18 progeny, suggesting that deletions, or crossover events had occurred. RAPD markers also identified a higher number of nonparental-type progeny than expected, thus confirming previous observations for high genetic variability in malaria parasites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)941-946
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1996

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Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique
random amplified polymorphic DNA technique
Plasmodium falciparum
inheritance (genetics)
DNA
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1
chromosomes
Genetic Markers
Parasites
chromosome
genetic polymorphism
parasites
Magnesium Chloride
genetic markers
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3
DNA Primers
malaria
parasite
polymorphism
Malaria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique in inheritance studies of Plasmodium falciparum. / Howard, Janet; Carlton, Jane M R; Walliker, David; Jensen, James B.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 82, No. 6, 12.1996, p. 941-946.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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