Use of microsimulation for examination of macroscopic fundamental diagram hysteresis patterns for hierarchical urban street networks

Nicolas Mühlich, Vikash V. Gayah, Monica Menendez

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study used microsimulation to analyze traffic performance on various idealized hierarchical urban street networks. Each network consisted of local streets and arterial streets, which represented the micro- and macrostructure of an urban network, respectively. Arterials were differentiated from local streets through additional green time at intersections and additional travel lanes. An idealized peak period was simulated for completely uniform demand patterns. Observed relationships between average network flow and density - known as the macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) - were used to compare the performance of arterial structures. Specifically, the size and shape of hysteresis loops that emerged in the MFD were used, since the networks were found to have more uniform congestion patterns during the onset of congestion than during congestion recovery. The presence of arterials was found to affect significantly the spatial distribution of congestion on the network. Arterials that passed through the congested center of the network and arterials that divided the network resulted in increased congestion inhomogeneity and larger hysteresis loops in the MFD. Arterials placed near the periphery of the network helped to attract vehicles to less-used areas of the network and reduce congestion in the center, which reduced congestion inhomogeneity. Furthermore, limited opportunities to access the arterials also contributed to dense pockets of congestion on nearby streets. For the network and demand conditions studied here, arterial ring roads appeared to distribute congestion more evenly and have had better network performance than arterial grids.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)117-126
    Number of pages10
    JournalTransportation Research Record
    Volume2491
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

    Fingerprint

    Hysteresis
    Hysteresis loops
    Network performance
    Spatial distribution
    Recovery
    Microstructure

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Civil and Structural Engineering
    • Mechanical Engineering

    Cite this

    Use of microsimulation for examination of macroscopic fundamental diagram hysteresis patterns for hierarchical urban street networks. / Mühlich, Nicolas; Gayah, Vikash V.; Menendez, Monica.

    In: Transportation Research Record, Vol. 2491, 01.01.2015, p. 117-126.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{6fe434e352b54381aa2ef3d2c93117cc,
    title = "Use of microsimulation for examination of macroscopic fundamental diagram hysteresis patterns for hierarchical urban street networks",
    abstract = "This study used microsimulation to analyze traffic performance on various idealized hierarchical urban street networks. Each network consisted of local streets and arterial streets, which represented the micro- and macrostructure of an urban network, respectively. Arterials were differentiated from local streets through additional green time at intersections and additional travel lanes. An idealized peak period was simulated for completely uniform demand patterns. Observed relationships between average network flow and density - known as the macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) - were used to compare the performance of arterial structures. Specifically, the size and shape of hysteresis loops that emerged in the MFD were used, since the networks were found to have more uniform congestion patterns during the onset of congestion than during congestion recovery. The presence of arterials was found to affect significantly the spatial distribution of congestion on the network. Arterials that passed through the congested center of the network and arterials that divided the network resulted in increased congestion inhomogeneity and larger hysteresis loops in the MFD. Arterials placed near the periphery of the network helped to attract vehicles to less-used areas of the network and reduce congestion in the center, which reduced congestion inhomogeneity. Furthermore, limited opportunities to access the arterials also contributed to dense pockets of congestion on nearby streets. For the network and demand conditions studied here, arterial ring roads appeared to distribute congestion more evenly and have had better network performance than arterial grids.",
    author = "Nicolas M{\"u}hlich and Gayah, {Vikash V.} and Monica Menendez",
    year = "2015",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.3141/2491-13",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "2491",
    pages = "117--126",
    journal = "Transportation Research Record",
    issn = "0361-1981",
    publisher = "US National Research Council",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Use of microsimulation for examination of macroscopic fundamental diagram hysteresis patterns for hierarchical urban street networks

    AU - Mühlich, Nicolas

    AU - Gayah, Vikash V.

    AU - Menendez, Monica

    PY - 2015/1/1

    Y1 - 2015/1/1

    N2 - This study used microsimulation to analyze traffic performance on various idealized hierarchical urban street networks. Each network consisted of local streets and arterial streets, which represented the micro- and macrostructure of an urban network, respectively. Arterials were differentiated from local streets through additional green time at intersections and additional travel lanes. An idealized peak period was simulated for completely uniform demand patterns. Observed relationships between average network flow and density - known as the macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) - were used to compare the performance of arterial structures. Specifically, the size and shape of hysteresis loops that emerged in the MFD were used, since the networks were found to have more uniform congestion patterns during the onset of congestion than during congestion recovery. The presence of arterials was found to affect significantly the spatial distribution of congestion on the network. Arterials that passed through the congested center of the network and arterials that divided the network resulted in increased congestion inhomogeneity and larger hysteresis loops in the MFD. Arterials placed near the periphery of the network helped to attract vehicles to less-used areas of the network and reduce congestion in the center, which reduced congestion inhomogeneity. Furthermore, limited opportunities to access the arterials also contributed to dense pockets of congestion on nearby streets. For the network and demand conditions studied here, arterial ring roads appeared to distribute congestion more evenly and have had better network performance than arterial grids.

    AB - This study used microsimulation to analyze traffic performance on various idealized hierarchical urban street networks. Each network consisted of local streets and arterial streets, which represented the micro- and macrostructure of an urban network, respectively. Arterials were differentiated from local streets through additional green time at intersections and additional travel lanes. An idealized peak period was simulated for completely uniform demand patterns. Observed relationships between average network flow and density - known as the macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) - were used to compare the performance of arterial structures. Specifically, the size and shape of hysteresis loops that emerged in the MFD were used, since the networks were found to have more uniform congestion patterns during the onset of congestion than during congestion recovery. The presence of arterials was found to affect significantly the spatial distribution of congestion on the network. Arterials that passed through the congested center of the network and arterials that divided the network resulted in increased congestion inhomogeneity and larger hysteresis loops in the MFD. Arterials placed near the periphery of the network helped to attract vehicles to less-used areas of the network and reduce congestion in the center, which reduced congestion inhomogeneity. Furthermore, limited opportunities to access the arterials also contributed to dense pockets of congestion on nearby streets. For the network and demand conditions studied here, arterial ring roads appeared to distribute congestion more evenly and have had better network performance than arterial grids.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84975855900&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84975855900&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.3141/2491-13

    DO - 10.3141/2491-13

    M3 - Article

    VL - 2491

    SP - 117

    EP - 126

    JO - Transportation Research Record

    JF - Transportation Research Record

    SN - 0361-1981

    ER -