Urinary C-peptide of insulin as a Non-Invasive marker of nutritional status: Some practicalities

James Higham, Cédric Girard-Buttoz, Antje Engelhardt, Michael Heistermann

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Nutritional status is a critical element of many aspects of animal ecology, but has proven difficult to measure non-invasively in studies of free-ranging animals. Urinary C-peptide of insulin (UCP), a small polypeptide cleaved in an equimolar ratio from proinsulin when the body converts it to insulin, offers great promise in this regard, and recent studies of several non-human primate species have utilized it with encouraging results. Despite this, there are a number of unresolved issues related to the collection, processing, storage and transport of samples. These include: contamination of samples on collection (most commonly by dirt or faeces), short-term storage before returning to a field station, differences in processing and long-term storage methods (blotting onto filter paper, freezing, lyophilizing), and for frozen samples, transportation while keeping samples frozen. Such issues have been investigated for urine samples in particular with respect to their effects on steroid hormone metabolites, but there has been little investigation of their effects on UCP measurement. We collected samples from captive macaques, and undertook a series of experiments where we systematically manipulated samples and tested the effects on subsequent UCP measurements. We show that contamination of urine samples by faeces led to a decrease in UCP levels by >90%, but that contamination with dirt did not have substantial effects. Short-term storage (up to 12 hours) of samples on ice did not affect UCP levels significantly, but medium-term storage (up to 78 hours) did. Freezing and lyophilization for long-term storage did not affect UCP levels, but blotting onto filter paper did. A transportation simulation showed that transporting frozen samples packed in ice and insulated should be acceptable, but only if it can be completed within a period of a few days and if freeze-thaw can be avoided. We use our data to make practical recommendations for fieldworkers.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbere22398
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume6
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    C-Peptide
    Nutritional Status
    nutritional status
    insulin
    peptides
    Insulin
    Contamination
    sampling
    Ice
    Feces
    Freezing
    Animals
    Steroid hormones
    freeze drying
    Urine
    Proinsulin
    Freeze Drying
    freezing
    ice
    urine

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Urinary C-peptide of insulin as a Non-Invasive marker of nutritional status : Some practicalities. / Higham, James; Girard-Buttoz, Cédric; Engelhardt, Antje; Heistermann, Michael.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 7, e22398, 2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Higham, James ; Girard-Buttoz, Cédric ; Engelhardt, Antje ; Heistermann, Michael. / Urinary C-peptide of insulin as a Non-Invasive marker of nutritional status : Some practicalities. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 7.
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