Urinary C-peptide measurement as a marker of nutritional status in macaques

Cédric Girard-Buttoz, James Higham, Michael Heistermann, Stefan Wedegärtner, Dario Maestripieri, Antje Engelhardt

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Studies of the nutritional status of wild animals are important in a wide range of research areas such as ecology, behavioural ecology and reproductive biology. However, they have so far been strongly limited by the indirect nature of the available non-invasive tools for the measurement of individual energetic status. The measurement of urinary C-peptide (UCP), which in humans and great apes shows a close link to individual nutritional status, may be a more direct, non-invasive tool for such studies in other primates as well and possibly even in non-primate mammals. Here, we test the suitability of UCPs as markers of nutritional status in non-hominid primates, investigating relationships between UCPs and body-mass-index (BMI), skinfold fatness, and plasma C-peptide levels in captive and free-ranging macaques. We also conducted a food reduction experiment, with daily monitoring of body weight and UCP levels. UCP levels showed significant positive correlations with BMI and skinfold fatness in both captive and free-ranging animals and with plasma C-peptide levels in captive ones. In the feeding experiment, UCP levels were positively correlated with changes in body mass and were significantly lower during food reduction than during re-feeding and the pre-experimental control condition. We conclude that UCPs may be used as reliable biomarkers of body condition and nutritional status in studies of free-ranging catarrhines. Our results open exciting opportunities for energetic studies on free-ranging primates and possibly also other mammals.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbere18042
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume6
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    C-Peptide
    Macaca
    Nutritional Status
    nutritional status
    peptides
    Primates
    Mammals
    Ecology
    body mass index
    Animals
    Body Mass Index
    mammals
    Plasmas
    ecology
    Food
    Wild Animals
    refeeding
    Hominidae
    Biomarkers
    Pongidae

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Girard-Buttoz, C., Higham, J., Heistermann, M., Wedegärtner, S., Maestripieri, D., & Engelhardt, A. (2011). Urinary C-peptide measurement as a marker of nutritional status in macaques. PLoS One, 6(3), [e18042]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018042

    Urinary C-peptide measurement as a marker of nutritional status in macaques. / Girard-Buttoz, Cédric; Higham, James; Heistermann, Michael; Wedegärtner, Stefan; Maestripieri, Dario; Engelhardt, Antje.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 3, e18042, 2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Girard-Buttoz, C, Higham, J, Heistermann, M, Wedegärtner, S, Maestripieri, D & Engelhardt, A 2011, 'Urinary C-peptide measurement as a marker of nutritional status in macaques', PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 3, e18042. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018042
    Girard-Buttoz C, Higham J, Heistermann M, Wedegärtner S, Maestripieri D, Engelhardt A. Urinary C-peptide measurement as a marker of nutritional status in macaques. PLoS One. 2011;6(3). e18042. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018042
    Girard-Buttoz, Cédric ; Higham, James ; Heistermann, Michael ; Wedegärtner, Stefan ; Maestripieri, Dario ; Engelhardt, Antje. / Urinary C-peptide measurement as a marker of nutritional status in macaques. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 3.
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