Unsuspected Cocaine Exposure in Young Children

Sigmund J. Kharasch, Deborah Glotzer, Robert Vinci, Michael Weitzman, James Sargent

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    To determine the prevalence of cocaine exposure among preschool children with clinically unsuspected signs and/or symptoms. Prevalence study. Pediatric emergency department in an inner-city hospital. 250 children aged 2 weeks to 5 years who underwent urine assays for cocaine prior to discharge from the emergency department. None. Six (2.4%) of the 250 urine assays (95% confidence interval, 0.5% to 4.3%) were positive for benzoylecgonine, the major urinary cocaine metabolite. Four of the positive urine assays were from children younger than 1 year and all children with positive urine assays were younger than 24 months. None of these children presented with a complaint or was identified as having clinical problems currently associated with childhood exposure to cocaine. Possible exposure routes include breast-feeding, intentional administration, accidental ingestion of cocaine or cocaine-contaminated household dust via normal hand-to-mouth activity, and passive inhalation of “crack” vapors. Among the inner-city children served by this hospital, significant numbers of infants and young children are being exposed to cocaine, and this exposure occurs in a clinically unsuspected population.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)204-206
    Number of pages3
    JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
    Volume145
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

    Fingerprint

    Cocaine
    Urine
    Hospital Emergency Service
    Urban Hospitals
    Preschool Children
    Breast Feeding
    Dust
    Inhalation
    Signs and Symptoms
    Mouth
    Hand
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Eating
    Confidence Intervals
    Pediatrics
    Population

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

    Cite this

    Kharasch, S. J., Glotzer, D., Vinci, R., Weitzman, M., & Sargent, J. (1991). Unsuspected Cocaine Exposure in Young Children. American Journal of Diseases of Children, 145(2), 204-206. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160020096025

    Unsuspected Cocaine Exposure in Young Children. / Kharasch, Sigmund J.; Glotzer, Deborah; Vinci, Robert; Weitzman, Michael; Sargent, James.

    In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 145, No. 2, 01.01.1991, p. 204-206.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kharasch, SJ, Glotzer, D, Vinci, R, Weitzman, M & Sargent, J 1991, 'Unsuspected Cocaine Exposure in Young Children', American Journal of Diseases of Children, vol. 145, no. 2, pp. 204-206. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160020096025
    Kharasch, Sigmund J. ; Glotzer, Deborah ; Vinci, Robert ; Weitzman, Michael ; Sargent, James. / Unsuspected Cocaine Exposure in Young Children. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1991 ; Vol. 145, No. 2. pp. 204-206.
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