Unprotected anal intercourse and sexually transmitted diseases in high-risk heterosexual women.

Samuel M. Jenness, Elizabeth M. Begier, Alan Neaigus, Christopher S. Murrill, Travis Wendel, Holly Hagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the association between unprotected anal intercourse and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among heterosexual women. In 2006 through 2007, women were recruited from high-risk areas in New York City through respondent-driven sampling as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance study. We used multiple logistic regression to determine the relationship between unprotected anal intercourse and HIV infection and past-year STD diagnosis. Of the 436 women studied, 38% had unprotected anal intercourse in the past year. Unprotected anal intercourse was more likely among those who were aged 30 to 39 years, were homeless, were frequent drug or binge alcohol users, had an incarcerated sexual partner, had sexual partners with whom they exchanged sex for money or drugs, or had more than 5 sexual partners in the past year. In the logistic regression, women who had unprotected anal intercourse were 2.6 times as likely as women who had only unprotected vaginal intercourse and 4.2 times as likely as women who had neither unprotected anal nor unprotected vaginal intercourse to report an STD diagnosis. We found no significant association between unprotected anal intercourse and HIV infection. Increased screening for history of unprotected anal intercourse and, for those who report recent unprotected anal intercourse, counseling and testing for HIV and STDs would likely reduce STD infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)745-750
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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