Universal quantum computation with the exchange interaction

D. P. DiVincenzo, D. Bacon, Julia Kempe, G. Burkard, K. B. Whaley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Various physical implementations of quantum computers are being investigated, although the requirements that must be met to make such devices a reality in the laboratory at present involve capabilities well beyond the state of the art. Recent solid-state approaches have used quantum dots, donor-atom nuclear spins or electron spins; in these architectures, the basic two-qubit quantum gate is generated by a tunable exchange interaction between spins (a Heisenberg interaction), whereas the one-qubit gates require control over a local magnetic field. Compared to the Heisenberg operation, the one-qubit operations are significantly slower, requiring substantially greater materials and device complexity - potentially contributing to a detrimental increase in the decoherence rate. Here we introduced an explicit scheme in which the Heisenberg interaction alone suffices to implement exactly any quantum computer circuit. This capability comes at a price of a factor of three in additional qubits, and about a factor of ten in additional two-qubit operations. Even at this cost, the ability to eliminate the complexity of one-qubit operations should accelerate progress towards solid-state implementations of quantum computation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-342
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume408
Issue number6810
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2000

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Quantum Dots
Equipment and Supplies
Magnetic Fields
Electrons
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DiVincenzo, D. P., Bacon, D., Kempe, J., Burkard, G., & Whaley, K. B. (2000). Universal quantum computation with the exchange interaction. Nature, 408(6810), 339-342. https://doi.org/10.1038/35042541

Universal quantum computation with the exchange interaction. / DiVincenzo, D. P.; Bacon, D.; Kempe, Julia; Burkard, G.; Whaley, K. B.

In: Nature, Vol. 408, No. 6810, 16.11.2000, p. 339-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DiVincenzo, DP, Bacon, D, Kempe, J, Burkard, G & Whaley, KB 2000, 'Universal quantum computation with the exchange interaction', Nature, vol. 408, no. 6810, pp. 339-342. https://doi.org/10.1038/35042541
DiVincenzo DP, Bacon D, Kempe J, Burkard G, Whaley KB. Universal quantum computation with the exchange interaction. Nature. 2000 Nov 16;408(6810):339-342. https://doi.org/10.1038/35042541
DiVincenzo, D. P. ; Bacon, D. ; Kempe, Julia ; Burkard, G. ; Whaley, K. B. / Universal quantum computation with the exchange interaction. In: Nature. 2000 ; Vol. 408, No. 6810. pp. 339-342.
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