Unexpected Scenario of Glass Transition in Polymer Globules

An Exactly Enumerable Mode

Rose Du, Alexander Yu Grosberg, Toyoichi Tanaka, Michael Rubinstein

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    We introduce a lattice model of glass transition in polymer globules. This model exhibits ergodicity breaking in which the disjoint regions of phase space do not arise uniformly, but as small chambers whose number increases exponentially with polymer density. Chamber sizes obey power law distribution, making phase space similar to a fractal foam. This clearly demonstrates the importance of the phase space geometry and topology in describing any glass-forming system, such as semicompact polymers during protein folding.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)2417-2420
    Number of pages4
    JournalPhysical Review Letters
    Volume84
    Issue number11
    StatePublished - Mar 13 2000

    Fingerprint

    globules
    Glass
    Polymers
    glass
    polymers
    chambers
    Fractals
    Protein Folding
    foams
    folding
    fractals
    topology
    proteins
    geometry

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physics and Astronomy(all)
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Du, R., Grosberg, A. Y., Tanaka, T., & Rubinstein, M. (2000). Unexpected Scenario of Glass Transition in Polymer Globules: An Exactly Enumerable Mode. Physical Review Letters, 84(11), 2417-2420.

    Unexpected Scenario of Glass Transition in Polymer Globules : An Exactly Enumerable Mode. / Du, Rose; Grosberg, Alexander Yu; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Rubinstein, Michael.

    In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 84, No. 11, 13.03.2000, p. 2417-2420.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Du, R, Grosberg, AY, Tanaka, T & Rubinstein, M 2000, 'Unexpected Scenario of Glass Transition in Polymer Globules: An Exactly Enumerable Mode', Physical Review Letters, vol. 84, no. 11, pp. 2417-2420.
    Du R, Grosberg AY, Tanaka T, Rubinstein M. Unexpected Scenario of Glass Transition in Polymer Globules: An Exactly Enumerable Mode. Physical Review Letters. 2000 Mar 13;84(11):2417-2420.
    Du, Rose ; Grosberg, Alexander Yu ; Tanaka, Toyoichi ; Rubinstein, Michael. / Unexpected Scenario of Glass Transition in Polymer Globules : An Exactly Enumerable Mode. In: Physical Review Letters. 2000 ; Vol. 84, No. 11. pp. 2417-2420.
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