Unequal burden of sleep-related obesity among black and white Americans

Girardin Jean-Louis, Shawn Youngstedt, Michael Grandner, Natasha J. Williams, Daniel Sarpong, Ferdinand Zizi, Gbenga Ogedegbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study ascertained whether individuals of the black race/ethnicity are unequally burdened by sleep-related overweight/obesity. Methods: Analysis was based on data obtained from Americans (ages, 18-85 years) in the National Health Interview Survey (1977-2009). Sleep duration was coded as either very short sleep (VSS) (≤5 hours), short sleep (SS) (5-6 hours), or long sleep (>8 hours), referenced to 7-8-hour sleepers. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥25.0 and ≤29.9 kg/m2 and obesity, BMI ≥30 kg/m2, referenced to normal weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2). Results: Multivariate-adjusted regression analyses indicated that, among whites, VSS was associated with a 10% increased likelihood of being overweight and 51% increased likelihood of being obese, relative to 7-8-hour sleepers. Short sleep was associated with a 13% increased likelihood of being overweight and 45% increased likelihood of being obese. Long sleep was associated with 21% increased likelihood of being obese. Among blacks, VSS was associated with a 76% increased likelihood of being overweight and 81% increased likelihood of being obese. Short sleep was associated with a 16% increased likelihood of being overweight and 32% increased likelihood of being obese. As for the white stratum, long sleep was associated with a 25% increased likelihood of being obese. Conclusion: Our investigation demonstrates strong linkages between inadequate sleep and overweight/obesity among black and white Americans. Although it cannot be said that insufficient sleep causes overweight/obesity, individuals of the black race/ethnicity sleeping ≤ 5 hours may be unequally burdened by sleep-related overweight/obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-176
Number of pages8
JournalSleep Health
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Sleep
Obesity
Body Mass Index
hydroquinone
Health Surveys
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Inadequate sleep
  • Obesity
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Jean-Louis, G., Youngstedt, S., Grandner, M., Williams, N. J., Sarpong, D., Zizi, F., & Ogedegbe, G. (2015). Unequal burden of sleep-related obesity among black and white Americans. Sleep Health, 1(3), 169-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2015.07.003

Unequal burden of sleep-related obesity among black and white Americans. / Jean-Louis, Girardin; Youngstedt, Shawn; Grandner, Michael; Williams, Natasha J.; Sarpong, Daniel; Zizi, Ferdinand; Ogedegbe, Gbenga.

In: Sleep Health, Vol. 1, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 169-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jean-Louis, G, Youngstedt, S, Grandner, M, Williams, NJ, Sarpong, D, Zizi, F & Ogedegbe, G 2015, 'Unequal burden of sleep-related obesity among black and white Americans', Sleep Health, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 169-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2015.07.003
Jean-Louis G, Youngstedt S, Grandner M, Williams NJ, Sarpong D, Zizi F et al. Unequal burden of sleep-related obesity among black and white Americans. Sleep Health. 2015 Sep 1;1(3):169-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2015.07.003
Jean-Louis, Girardin ; Youngstedt, Shawn ; Grandner, Michael ; Williams, Natasha J. ; Sarpong, Daniel ; Zizi, Ferdinand ; Ogedegbe, Gbenga. / Unequal burden of sleep-related obesity among black and white Americans. In: Sleep Health. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 3. pp. 169-176.
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abstract = "Background: This study ascertained whether individuals of the black race/ethnicity are unequally burdened by sleep-related overweight/obesity. Methods: Analysis was based on data obtained from Americans (ages, 18-85 years) in the National Health Interview Survey (1977-2009). Sleep duration was coded as either very short sleep (VSS) (≤5 hours), short sleep (SS) (5-6 hours), or long sleep (>8 hours), referenced to 7-8-hour sleepers. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥25.0 and ≤29.9 kg/m2 and obesity, BMI ≥30 kg/m2, referenced to normal weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2). Results: Multivariate-adjusted regression analyses indicated that, among whites, VSS was associated with a 10{\%} increased likelihood of being overweight and 51{\%} increased likelihood of being obese, relative to 7-8-hour sleepers. Short sleep was associated with a 13{\%} increased likelihood of being overweight and 45{\%} increased likelihood of being obese. Long sleep was associated with 21{\%} increased likelihood of being obese. Among blacks, VSS was associated with a 76{\%} increased likelihood of being overweight and 81{\%} increased likelihood of being obese. Short sleep was associated with a 16{\%} increased likelihood of being overweight and 32{\%} increased likelihood of being obese. As for the white stratum, long sleep was associated with a 25{\%} increased likelihood of being obese. Conclusion: Our investigation demonstrates strong linkages between inadequate sleep and overweight/obesity among black and white Americans. Although it cannot be said that insufficient sleep causes overweight/obesity, individuals of the black race/ethnicity sleeping ≤ 5 hours may be unequally burdened by sleep-related overweight/obesity.",
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AB - Background: This study ascertained whether individuals of the black race/ethnicity are unequally burdened by sleep-related overweight/obesity. Methods: Analysis was based on data obtained from Americans (ages, 18-85 years) in the National Health Interview Survey (1977-2009). Sleep duration was coded as either very short sleep (VSS) (≤5 hours), short sleep (SS) (5-6 hours), or long sleep (>8 hours), referenced to 7-8-hour sleepers. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥25.0 and ≤29.9 kg/m2 and obesity, BMI ≥30 kg/m2, referenced to normal weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2). Results: Multivariate-adjusted regression analyses indicated that, among whites, VSS was associated with a 10% increased likelihood of being overweight and 51% increased likelihood of being obese, relative to 7-8-hour sleepers. Short sleep was associated with a 13% increased likelihood of being overweight and 45% increased likelihood of being obese. Long sleep was associated with 21% increased likelihood of being obese. Among blacks, VSS was associated with a 76% increased likelihood of being overweight and 81% increased likelihood of being obese. Short sleep was associated with a 16% increased likelihood of being overweight and 32% increased likelihood of being obese. As for the white stratum, long sleep was associated with a 25% increased likelihood of being obese. Conclusion: Our investigation demonstrates strong linkages between inadequate sleep and overweight/obesity among black and white Americans. Although it cannot be said that insufficient sleep causes overweight/obesity, individuals of the black race/ethnicity sleeping ≤ 5 hours may be unequally burdened by sleep-related overweight/obesity.

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