Understanding the role of mhealth and other media interventions for behavior change to enhance child survival and development in low-and middle-income countries: An evidence review

Elizabeth S. Higgs, Allison B. Goldberg, Alain B. Labrique, Stephanie Cook, Carina Schmid, Charlotte F. Cole, Rafael A. Obregón

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Given the high morbidity and mortality among children in low-and middle-income countries as a result of preventable causes, the U.S. government and the United Nations Children's Fund convened an Evidence Summit on Enhancing Child Survival and Development in Lower-and Middle-Income Countries by Achieving Population-Level Behavior Change on June 3-4, 2013, in Washington, D.C. This article summarizes evidence for technological advances associated with population-level behavior changes necessary to advance child survival and healthy development in children under 5 years of age in low-and middle-income countries. After a rigorous evidence selection process, the authors assessed science, technology, and innovation papers that used mHealth, social/transmedia, multiplatform media, health literacy, and devices for behavior changes supporting child survival and development. Because of an insufficient number of studies on health literacy and devices that supported causal attribution of interventions to outcomes, the review focused on mHealth, social/transmedia, and multiplatform media. Overall, this review found that some mHealth interventions have sufficient evidence to make topic-specific recommendations for broader implementation, scaling, and next research steps (e.g., adherence to HIV/AIDS antiretroviral therapy, uptake and demand of maternal health service, and compliance with malaria treatment guidelines). While some media evidence demonstrates effectiveness in changing cognitive abilities, knowledge, and attitudes, evidence is minimal on behavioral endpoints linked to child survival. Population level behavior change is necessary to end preventable child deaths. Donors and low-and middle-income countries are encouraged to implement recommendations for informing practice, policy, and research decisions to fully maximize the impact potential of mHealth and multimedia for child survival and development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-189
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - May 13 2014

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Telemedicine
Child Development
Health Literacy
income
Health
evidence
Maternal Health Services
demographic situation
Population
Equipment and Supplies
Child Mortality
Multimedia
Aptitude
United Nations
Research
Malaria
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Innovation
Tissue Donors
HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication
  • Medicine(all)

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Understanding the role of mhealth and other media interventions for behavior change to enhance child survival and development in low-and middle-income countries : An evidence review. / Higgs, Elizabeth S.; Goldberg, Allison B.; Labrique, Alain B.; Cook, Stephanie; Schmid, Carina; Cole, Charlotte F.; Obregón, Rafael A.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 19, 13.05.2014, p. 164-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Higgs, Elizabeth S. ; Goldberg, Allison B. ; Labrique, Alain B. ; Cook, Stephanie ; Schmid, Carina ; Cole, Charlotte F. ; Obregón, Rafael A. / Understanding the role of mhealth and other media interventions for behavior change to enhance child survival and development in low-and middle-income countries : An evidence review. In: Journal of Health Communication. 2014 ; Vol. 19. pp. 164-189.
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