Understanding the context of HIV risk behavior among HIV-positive and HIV-negative female sex workers and male bar clients following antiretroviral therapy rollout in Mombasa, Kenya

Lauren McClelland, George Wanje, Frances Kashonga, Lydiah Kibe, R. Scott McClelland, James Kiarie, Kishorchandra Mandaliya, Norbert Peshu, Ann Kurth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored perceptions of HIV following local introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), among 30 HIV-positive and -negative female sex workers (FSWs) and 10 male bar patrons in Mombasa, Kenya. Semistructured interviews were analyzed qualitatively to identify determinants of sexual risk behaviors. ART was not perceived as a barrier to safer sex and in some cases led to decreased high-risk behaviors. Barriers to safer sex included economic pressure and sexual partnership types. Many women reported that negotiating condom use is more difficult in long-term partnerships. These women favored short-term partnerships to minimize risk through consistent condom use. For women living with HIV, concern about maintaining health and avoiding HIV super infection was a strong motivator of protective behaviors. For HIV-negative women, a negative HIV test was a powerful motivator. Incorporation of context- and serostatus-specific factors (e.g., self-protection for HIV-positive women) into tailored prevention counseling may support high-risk women to reduce risk behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-312
Number of pages14
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

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Sex Workers
Kenya
Risk-Taking
risk behavior
HIV
worker
Safe Sex
Condoms
Therapeutics
civil defense
Negotiating
Sexual Behavior
HIV Infections
Counseling
counseling
Economics
Interviews
determinants
Pressure
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Health(social science)

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Understanding the context of HIV risk behavior among HIV-positive and HIV-negative female sex workers and male bar clients following antiretroviral therapy rollout in Mombasa, Kenya. / McClelland, Lauren; Wanje, George; Kashonga, Frances; Kibe, Lydiah; McClelland, R. Scott; Kiarie, James; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Peshu, Norbert; Kurth, Ann.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 23, No. 4, 08.2011, p. 299-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McClelland, Lauren ; Wanje, George ; Kashonga, Frances ; Kibe, Lydiah ; McClelland, R. Scott ; Kiarie, James ; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra ; Peshu, Norbert ; Kurth, Ann. / Understanding the context of HIV risk behavior among HIV-positive and HIV-negative female sex workers and male bar clients following antiretroviral therapy rollout in Mombasa, Kenya. In: AIDS Education and Prevention. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 299-312.
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