Understanding How Charged Nanoparticles Electrostatically Assemble and Distribute in 1-D

Keith M. Carroll, Heiko Wolf, Armin Knoll, Jennifer E. Curtis, Yadong Zhang, Seth R. Marder, Elisa Riedo, Urs Duerig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effects of increasing the driving forces for a 1-D assembly of nanoparticles onto a surface are investigated with experimental results and models. Modifications, which take into account not only the particle-particle interactions but also particle-surface interactions, to previously established extended random sequential adsorption simulations are tested and verified. Both data and model are compared against the heterogeneous random sequential adsorption simulations, and finally, a connection between the two models is suggested. The experiments and models show that increasing the particle-surface interaction leads to narrower particle distribution; this narrowing is attributed to the surface interactions compensating against the particle-particle interactions. The long-term advantage of this work is that the assembly of nanoparticles in solution is now understood as controlled not only by particle-particle interactions but also by particle-surface interactions. Both particle-particle and particle-surface interactions can be used to tune how nanoparticles distribute themselves on a surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13600-13610
Number of pages11
JournalLangmuir
Volume32
Issue number51
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2016

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Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
Particle interactions
surface reactions
particle interactions
Adsorption
assembly
adsorption
simulation
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Carroll, K. M., Wolf, H., Knoll, A., Curtis, J. E., Zhang, Y., Marder, S. R., ... Duerig, U. (2016). Understanding How Charged Nanoparticles Electrostatically Assemble and Distribute in 1-D. Langmuir, 32(51), 13600-13610. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b03471

Understanding How Charged Nanoparticles Electrostatically Assemble and Distribute in 1-D. / Carroll, Keith M.; Wolf, Heiko; Knoll, Armin; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Yadong; Marder, Seth R.; Riedo, Elisa; Duerig, Urs.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 32, No. 51, 27.12.2016, p. 13600-13610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carroll, KM, Wolf, H, Knoll, A, Curtis, JE, Zhang, Y, Marder, SR, Riedo, E & Duerig, U 2016, 'Understanding How Charged Nanoparticles Electrostatically Assemble and Distribute in 1-D', Langmuir, vol. 32, no. 51, pp. 13600-13610. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b03471
Carroll KM, Wolf H, Knoll A, Curtis JE, Zhang Y, Marder SR et al. Understanding How Charged Nanoparticles Electrostatically Assemble and Distribute in 1-D. Langmuir. 2016 Dec 27;32(51):13600-13610. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b03471
Carroll, Keith M. ; Wolf, Heiko ; Knoll, Armin ; Curtis, Jennifer E. ; Zhang, Yadong ; Marder, Seth R. ; Riedo, Elisa ; Duerig, Urs. / Understanding How Charged Nanoparticles Electrostatically Assemble and Distribute in 1-D. In: Langmuir. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 51. pp. 13600-13610.
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