Uncertainty-based competition between prefrontal and dorsolateral striatal systems for behavioral control

Nathaniel D. Daw, Yael Niv, Peter Dayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A broad range of neural and behavioral data suggests that the brain contains multiple systems for behavioral choice, including one associated with prefrontal cortex and another with dorsolateral striatum. However, such a surfeit of control raises an additional choice problem: how to arbitrate between the systems when they disagree. Here, we consider dual-action choice systems from a normative perspective, using the computational theory of reinforcement learning. We identify a key trade-off pitting computational simplicity against the flexible and statistically efficient use of experience. The trade-off is realized in a competition between the dorsolateral striatal and prefrontal systems. We suggest a Bayesian principle of arbitration between them according to uncertainty, so each controller is deployed when it should be most accurate. This provides a unifying account of a wealth of experimental evidence about the factors favoring dominance by either system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1704-1711
Number of pages8
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

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Corpus Striatum
Negotiating
Prefrontal Cortex
Uncertainty
Learning
Brain
Reinforcement (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Uncertainty-based competition between prefrontal and dorsolateral striatal systems for behavioral control. / Daw, Nathaniel D.; Niv, Yael; Dayan, Peter.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 8, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 1704-1711.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daw, Nathaniel D. ; Niv, Yael ; Dayan, Peter. / Uncertainty-based competition between prefrontal and dorsolateral striatal systems for behavioral control. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 12. pp. 1704-1711.
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