Two double-blinded, randomized, comparative trials of 4 Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccines in HIV-1-infected individuals across a spectrum of disease severity

AIDS clinical trials groups 209 and 214

AIDS Clinical Trials Group 209 and 214 Study Teams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in <30% of vaccine recipients. LPRs were elicited primarily in study participants with a CD4 cell count >350 cells/mm3 and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P =.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1357-1364
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume182
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Vaccines
Clinical Trials
Cellular Immunity
RNA
Immune System Diseases
Immunity
Vaccination
Viruses
Safety
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{ab899fb42f834872b6a101310172e9d0,
title = "Two double-blinded, randomized, comparative trials of 4 Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccines in HIV-1-infected individuals across a spectrum of disease severity: AIDS clinical trials groups 209 and 214",
abstract = "The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in <30{\%} of vaccine recipients. LPRs were elicited primarily in study participants with a CD4 cell count >350 cells/mm3 and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P =.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.",
author = "{AIDS Clinical Trials Group 209 and 214 Study Teams} and Schooley, {Robert T.} and Cathie Spino and Daniel Kuritzkes and Walker, {Bruce D.} and Valentine, {Fred T.} and Hirsch, {Martin S.} and Elizabeth Cooney and Gerald Friedland and Smriti Kundu and Merigan, {Thomas C.} and McElrath, {M. Juliana} and Ann Collier and Susan Plaeger and Ronald Mitsuyasu and James Kahn and Patrick Haslett and Patricia Uherova and Victor DeGruttola and Simon Chiu and Bin Zhang and Gayle Jones and Dawn Bell and Nzeera Ketter and Thomas Twadell and David Chernoff and Mary Rosandich and Pamela Clax and Kathryn Pattishall and Rebecca Betensky and Kristine Coughlin and Jessica McFarland and Rios, {V. Miles} and Lynette Purdue and Ray, {M. Graham}",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/315860",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "182",
pages = "1357--1364",
journal = "Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "0022-1899",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Two double-blinded, randomized, comparative trials of 4 Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccines in HIV-1-infected individuals across a spectrum of disease severity

T2 - AIDS clinical trials groups 209 and 214

AU - AIDS Clinical Trials Group 209 and 214 Study Teams

AU - Schooley, Robert T.

AU - Spino, Cathie

AU - Kuritzkes, Daniel

AU - Walker, Bruce D.

AU - Valentine, Fred T.

AU - Hirsch, Martin S.

AU - Cooney, Elizabeth

AU - Friedland, Gerald

AU - Kundu, Smriti

AU - Merigan, Thomas C.

AU - McElrath, M. Juliana

AU - Collier, Ann

AU - Plaeger, Susan

AU - Mitsuyasu, Ronald

AU - Kahn, James

AU - Haslett, Patrick

AU - Uherova, Patricia

AU - DeGruttola, Victor

AU - Chiu, Simon

AU - Zhang, Bin

AU - Jones, Gayle

AU - Bell, Dawn

AU - Ketter, Nzeera

AU - Twadell, Thomas

AU - Chernoff, David

AU - Rosandich, Mary

AU - Clax, Pamela

AU - Pattishall, Kathryn

AU - Betensky, Rebecca

AU - Coughlin, Kristine

AU - McFarland, Jessica

AU - Rios, V. Miles

AU - Purdue, Lynette

AU - Ray, M. Graham

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in <30% of vaccine recipients. LPRs were elicited primarily in study participants with a CD4 cell count >350 cells/mm3 and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P =.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.

AB - The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in <30% of vaccine recipients. LPRs were elicited primarily in study participants with a CD4 cell count >350 cells/mm3 and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P =.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.

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U2 - 10.1086/315860

DO - 10.1086/315860

M3 - Article

VL - 182

SP - 1357

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JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

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