Tunable stiffness scanning microscope probe

Clemens Mueller-Falcke, Rafael Song, Sang Gook Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has been an important tool to image and manipulate micro/nano scale structures. The measurement is based on the optical detection of a very small deflection of a flexible cantilever while traveling near the sample surface. However, the use of a cantilever with a sharp oxidized conical tip is quite costly, very difficult to scale up and unable to scan variable hardness surfaces, such as cell membranes in vivo. A concept of in-plane probe tip is developed. It has a carbon nanotube tip, built-in actuator and a tip deflection sensor, all assembled in the same plane. Most of all, an in-plane probe design would enable the stiffness of the probe to become tunable by using MEMS clutched springs. This allows a continuous measurement of samples with inhomogeneous surface hardness without changing the probe in the middle of a measurement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number04
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume5604
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventOptomechatronic Micro/Nano Components, Devices, and Systems - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2004Oct 28 2004

Fingerprint

Microscope
Scanning
stiffness
Stiffness
Microscopes
Probe
microscopes
scanning
probes
Cantilever
Deflection
Hardness
Scanning Probe Microscopy
deflection
Scanning probe microscopy
hardness
Carbon Nanotubes
Scale-up
Cell membranes
Micro-electro-mechanical Systems

Keywords

  • Atomic Force Microscopy
  • Carbon nanotube tip
  • Tunable stiffness probe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Tunable stiffness scanning microscope probe. / Mueller-Falcke, Clemens; Song, Rafael; Kim, Sang Gook.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 5604, 04, 01.12.2004, p. 31-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

@article{f0311470c999475ebab7e44856187aad,
title = "Tunable stiffness scanning microscope probe",
abstract = "Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has been an important tool to image and manipulate micro/nano scale structures. The measurement is based on the optical detection of a very small deflection of a flexible cantilever while traveling near the sample surface. However, the use of a cantilever with a sharp oxidized conical tip is quite costly, very difficult to scale up and unable to scan variable hardness surfaces, such as cell membranes in vivo. A concept of in-plane probe tip is developed. It has a carbon nanotube tip, built-in actuator and a tip deflection sensor, all assembled in the same plane. Most of all, an in-plane probe design would enable the stiffness of the probe to become tunable by using MEMS clutched springs. This allows a continuous measurement of samples with inhomogeneous surface hardness without changing the probe in the middle of a measurement.",
keywords = "Atomic Force Microscopy, Carbon nanotube tip, Tunable stiffness probe",
author = "Clemens Mueller-Falcke and Rafael Song and Kim, {Sang Gook}",
year = "2004",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1117/12.571273",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5604",
pages = "31--37",
journal = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
issn = "0277-786X",
publisher = "SPIE",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tunable stiffness scanning microscope probe

AU - Mueller-Falcke, Clemens

AU - Song, Rafael

AU - Kim, Sang Gook

PY - 2004/12/1

Y1 - 2004/12/1

N2 - Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has been an important tool to image and manipulate micro/nano scale structures. The measurement is based on the optical detection of a very small deflection of a flexible cantilever while traveling near the sample surface. However, the use of a cantilever with a sharp oxidized conical tip is quite costly, very difficult to scale up and unable to scan variable hardness surfaces, such as cell membranes in vivo. A concept of in-plane probe tip is developed. It has a carbon nanotube tip, built-in actuator and a tip deflection sensor, all assembled in the same plane. Most of all, an in-plane probe design would enable the stiffness of the probe to become tunable by using MEMS clutched springs. This allows a continuous measurement of samples with inhomogeneous surface hardness without changing the probe in the middle of a measurement.

AB - Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has been an important tool to image and manipulate micro/nano scale structures. The measurement is based on the optical detection of a very small deflection of a flexible cantilever while traveling near the sample surface. However, the use of a cantilever with a sharp oxidized conical tip is quite costly, very difficult to scale up and unable to scan variable hardness surfaces, such as cell membranes in vivo. A concept of in-plane probe tip is developed. It has a carbon nanotube tip, built-in actuator and a tip deflection sensor, all assembled in the same plane. Most of all, an in-plane probe design would enable the stiffness of the probe to become tunable by using MEMS clutched springs. This allows a continuous measurement of samples with inhomogeneous surface hardness without changing the probe in the middle of a measurement.

KW - Atomic Force Microscopy

KW - Carbon nanotube tip

KW - Tunable stiffness probe

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17744381006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17744381006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.571273

DO - 10.1117/12.571273

M3 - Conference article

AN - SCOPUS:17744381006

VL - 5604

SP - 31

EP - 37

JO - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

JF - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

SN - 0277-786X

M1 - 04

ER -