Trends in injection risk behaviors in a sample of New York City injection drug users: 1992-1995

Mark Beardsley, Sherry Deren, Stephanie Tortu, Marjorie F. Goldstein, Kristine Ziek, Rahul Hamid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study assessed the relation between year of recruitment into an AIDS prevention project and likelihood of engaging (yes/no) in injection risk behaviors. Methods: In total, 834 injection drug users were recruited over a 44-month period (January 1992-August 1995) in New York City. Logistic regression was used to examine trends in three behaviors, across four successive annual cohorts: using needles/syringes that were previously used by another person, using injection supplies (e.g., cookers, cotton, rinse water) that had been previously used, and giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person. Results: Significant (p <.0001) decreasing trends occurred in two behaviors: giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person and use of injection supplies that had been used by another person. Sample characteristics were generally consistent over time and did not obviate significant injection risk trends. Conclusions: Decreasing trends in injection risk behaviors could not be explained by changing sample characteristics. Even though some injectors report engaging in risky injection practices, the confluence of numerous AIDS prevention efforts in the 1990s has contributed to an overall reduction in the likelihood of such behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-289
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 1999

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
Drug Users
Injections
Syringes
Needles
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Logistic Models
Water

Keywords

  • Injection drug users
  • Injection risk behaviors
  • Injection risks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Trends in injection risk behaviors in a sample of New York City injection drug users : 1992-1995. / Beardsley, Mark; Deren, Sherry; Tortu, Stephanie; Goldstein, Marjorie F.; Ziek, Kristine; Hamid, Rahul.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.03.1999, p. 283-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beardsley, Mark ; Deren, Sherry ; Tortu, Stephanie ; Goldstein, Marjorie F. ; Ziek, Kristine ; Hamid, Rahul. / Trends in injection risk behaviors in a sample of New York City injection drug users : 1992-1995. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology. 1999 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 283-289.
@article{e263c0e70fd54c66b8857d8f4f0e84fc,
title = "Trends in injection risk behaviors in a sample of New York City injection drug users: 1992-1995",
abstract = "Objectives: This study assessed the relation between year of recruitment into an AIDS prevention project and likelihood of engaging (yes/no) in injection risk behaviors. Methods: In total, 834 injection drug users were recruited over a 44-month period (January 1992-August 1995) in New York City. Logistic regression was used to examine trends in three behaviors, across four successive annual cohorts: using needles/syringes that were previously used by another person, using injection supplies (e.g., cookers, cotton, rinse water) that had been previously used, and giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person. Results: Significant (p <.0001) decreasing trends occurred in two behaviors: giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person and use of injection supplies that had been used by another person. Sample characteristics were generally consistent over time and did not obviate significant injection risk trends. Conclusions: Decreasing trends in injection risk behaviors could not be explained by changing sample characteristics. Even though some injectors report engaging in risky injection practices, the confluence of numerous AIDS prevention efforts in the 1990s has contributed to an overall reduction in the likelihood of such behaviors.",
keywords = "Injection drug users, Injection risk behaviors, Injection risks",
author = "Mark Beardsley and Sherry Deren and Stephanie Tortu and Goldstein, {Marjorie F.} and Kristine Ziek and Rahul Hamid",
year = "1999",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "283--289",
journal = "Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes",
issn = "1525-4135",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in injection risk behaviors in a sample of New York City injection drug users

T2 - 1992-1995

AU - Beardsley, Mark

AU - Deren, Sherry

AU - Tortu, Stephanie

AU - Goldstein, Marjorie F.

AU - Ziek, Kristine

AU - Hamid, Rahul

PY - 1999/3/1

Y1 - 1999/3/1

N2 - Objectives: This study assessed the relation between year of recruitment into an AIDS prevention project and likelihood of engaging (yes/no) in injection risk behaviors. Methods: In total, 834 injection drug users were recruited over a 44-month period (January 1992-August 1995) in New York City. Logistic regression was used to examine trends in three behaviors, across four successive annual cohorts: using needles/syringes that were previously used by another person, using injection supplies (e.g., cookers, cotton, rinse water) that had been previously used, and giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person. Results: Significant (p <.0001) decreasing trends occurred in two behaviors: giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person and use of injection supplies that had been used by another person. Sample characteristics were generally consistent over time and did not obviate significant injection risk trends. Conclusions: Decreasing trends in injection risk behaviors could not be explained by changing sample characteristics. Even though some injectors report engaging in risky injection practices, the confluence of numerous AIDS prevention efforts in the 1990s has contributed to an overall reduction in the likelihood of such behaviors.

AB - Objectives: This study assessed the relation between year of recruitment into an AIDS prevention project and likelihood of engaging (yes/no) in injection risk behaviors. Methods: In total, 834 injection drug users were recruited over a 44-month period (January 1992-August 1995) in New York City. Logistic regression was used to examine trends in three behaviors, across four successive annual cohorts: using needles/syringes that were previously used by another person, using injection supplies (e.g., cookers, cotton, rinse water) that had been previously used, and giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person. Results: Significant (p <.0001) decreasing trends occurred in two behaviors: giving or lending of used needles/syringes to another person and use of injection supplies that had been used by another person. Sample characteristics were generally consistent over time and did not obviate significant injection risk trends. Conclusions: Decreasing trends in injection risk behaviors could not be explained by changing sample characteristics. Even though some injectors report engaging in risky injection practices, the confluence of numerous AIDS prevention efforts in the 1990s has contributed to an overall reduction in the likelihood of such behaviors.

KW - Injection drug users

KW - Injection risk behaviors

KW - Injection risks

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032895296&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032895296&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 283

EP - 289

JO - Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

JF - Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

SN - 1525-4135

IS - 3

ER -