Trends in Hospital Discharges and Dispositions for Episodes of Co-occurring Severe Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders

Jennifer I. Manuel, Megan E. Gandy, David Rieker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study examined trends in general hospital discharges and dispositions involving episodes of severe mental illness (SMI) with and without co-occurring substance use disorders. We analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey from 1979 through 2008. Discharges involving SMI and co-occurring substance use disorders (COD) were associated with shorter lengths of stay and had a greater likelihood of being discharged routinely or home and reduced likelihood of being transferred to a short- or long-term facility. Although COD discharges had a greater odds of leaving against medical advice than SMI discharges, this effect was not significant over time. A greater understanding of hospital discharge planning practices is needed to ensure that patients are linked to appropriate aftercare services.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)168-175
    Number of pages8
    JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
    Volume42
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

    Fingerprint

    Substance-Related Disorders
    Hospital Planning
    Health Care Surveys
    Aftercare
    Patient Discharge
    General Hospitals
    Length of Stay

    Keywords

    • Co-occurring disorders
    • Discharge status
    • Hospital admissions
    • Length of stay

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Phychiatric Mental Health
    • Health Policy
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Trends in Hospital Discharges and Dispositions for Episodes of Co-occurring Severe Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders. / Manuel, Jennifer I.; Gandy, Megan E.; Rieker, David.

    In: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 168-175.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{66168b9e21f04c92abf4607582df9693,
    title = "Trends in Hospital Discharges and Dispositions for Episodes of Co-occurring Severe Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders",
    abstract = "This study examined trends in general hospital discharges and dispositions involving episodes of severe mental illness (SMI) with and without co-occurring substance use disorders. We analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey from 1979 through 2008. Discharges involving SMI and co-occurring substance use disorders (COD) were associated with shorter lengths of stay and had a greater likelihood of being discharged routinely or home and reduced likelihood of being transferred to a short- or long-term facility. Although COD discharges had a greater odds of leaving against medical advice than SMI discharges, this effect was not significant over time. A greater understanding of hospital discharge planning practices is needed to ensure that patients are linked to appropriate aftercare services.",
    keywords = "Co-occurring disorders, Discharge status, Hospital admissions, Length of stay",
    author = "Manuel, {Jennifer I.} and Gandy, {Megan E.} and David Rieker",
    year = "2015",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1007/s10488-014-0540-x",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "42",
    pages = "168--175",
    journal = "Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research",
    issn = "0894-587X",
    publisher = "Springer New York",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Trends in Hospital Discharges and Dispositions for Episodes of Co-occurring Severe Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders

    AU - Manuel, Jennifer I.

    AU - Gandy, Megan E.

    AU - Rieker, David

    PY - 2015/1/1

    Y1 - 2015/1/1

    N2 - This study examined trends in general hospital discharges and dispositions involving episodes of severe mental illness (SMI) with and without co-occurring substance use disorders. We analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey from 1979 through 2008. Discharges involving SMI and co-occurring substance use disorders (COD) were associated with shorter lengths of stay and had a greater likelihood of being discharged routinely or home and reduced likelihood of being transferred to a short- or long-term facility. Although COD discharges had a greater odds of leaving against medical advice than SMI discharges, this effect was not significant over time. A greater understanding of hospital discharge planning practices is needed to ensure that patients are linked to appropriate aftercare services.

    AB - This study examined trends in general hospital discharges and dispositions involving episodes of severe mental illness (SMI) with and without co-occurring substance use disorders. We analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey from 1979 through 2008. Discharges involving SMI and co-occurring substance use disorders (COD) were associated with shorter lengths of stay and had a greater likelihood of being discharged routinely or home and reduced likelihood of being transferred to a short- or long-term facility. Although COD discharges had a greater odds of leaving against medical advice than SMI discharges, this effect was not significant over time. A greater understanding of hospital discharge planning practices is needed to ensure that patients are linked to appropriate aftercare services.

    KW - Co-occurring disorders

    KW - Discharge status

    KW - Hospital admissions

    KW - Length of stay

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893175270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893175270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1007/s10488-014-0540-x

    DO - 10.1007/s10488-014-0540-x

    M3 - Article

    VL - 42

    SP - 168

    EP - 175

    JO - Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

    JF - Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

    SN - 0894-587X

    IS - 2

    ER -