Trends and issues in child and adolescent mental health

Sharon Glied, Alison Evans Cuellar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

An estimated 11 percent of American children have a mental health impairment, yet they rely upon a piece of the health care system that does not work well. Government policies for children's mental health operate in two ways: by affecting health insurance for children, and by funding services directly. Major changes within both categories have shaped the types, sources, and financing of services for children with mental health problems. These policies, along with scientific advances in child mental health, social changes, and health policy more generally, have contributed to an improvement in child mental health services over the past fifteen years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-50
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Mental Health
mental health
adolescent
trend
Child Health Services
Mental Health Services
Health Insurance
Public Policy
Health Policy
Social Change
Delivery of Health Care
health insurance
health policy
government policy
Adolescent Health
social change
health service
funding
health care
Child Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Trends and issues in child and adolescent mental health. / Glied, Sharon; Cuellar, Alison Evans.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2003, p. 39-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Glied, Sharon ; Cuellar, Alison Evans. / Trends and issues in child and adolescent mental health. In: Health Affairs. 2003 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 39-50.
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