Transnational delegation in global environmental governance: When do non-state actors govern?

Jessica Green

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Non-state actors - including firms, non-governmental organizations, and networks - are now a permanent fixture in environmental politics. However, we know surprisingly little about when states choose to delegate to non-state actors through multilateral treaties. This paper provides an historical picture, tracing patterns of delegation to non-state agents in a random sample of multilateral environmental agreements from 1902 to 2002. I introduce a new unit of analysis - the policy function - to understand what non-state actors actually do as agents. I find that analyses of delegation are sensitive to the unit of analysis; patterns of delegation at the treaty level are very different from those at the level of individual policy functions. While overall the decision to delegate to non-state actors - what I term transnational delegation - is rare, it has grown over time. Complex treaties, those with secretariats, and those focused on the management of nature are more apt to delegate to non-state actors. Non-state agents fill a small, but growing role in multilateral environmental treaties.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalRegulation and Governance
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2017

    Fingerprint

    treaty
    governance
    random sample
    firm
    politics
    management

    Keywords

    • Delegation
    • Environmental governance
    • Private authority

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Public Administration
    • Law

    Cite this

    Transnational delegation in global environmental governance : When do non-state actors govern? / Green, Jessica.

    In: Regulation and Governance, 2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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