Translational Control of Long-Lasting Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

Mauro Costa-Mattioli, Wayne S. Sossin, Eric Klann, Nahum Sonenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory are dependent on new protein synthesis. Recent advances obtained from genetic, physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical studies provide strong evidence that translational control plays a key role in regulating long-term changes in neural circuits and thus long-term modifications in behavior. Translational control is important for regulating both general protein synthesis and synthesis of specific proteins in response to neuronal activity. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent progress in the field and highlight the prospects for better understanding of long-lasting changes in synaptic strength, learning, and memory and implications for neurological diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-26
Number of pages17
JournalNeuron
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2009

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Neuronal Plasticity
Proteins
Behavior Therapy
Learning
Pharmacology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Translational Control of Long-Lasting Synaptic Plasticity and Memory. / Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Sossin, Wayne S.; Klann, Eric; Sonenberg, Nahum.

In: Neuron, Vol. 61, No. 1, 15.01.2009, p. 10-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costa-Mattioli, Mauro ; Sossin, Wayne S. ; Klann, Eric ; Sonenberg, Nahum. / Translational Control of Long-Lasting Synaptic Plasticity and Memory. In: Neuron. 2009 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 10-26.
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