Translating the Diabetes Prevention Program to Primary Care A Pilot Study

Robin Whittemore, Gail D'Eramo Melkus, Julie Wagner, James Dziura, Veronika Northrup, Margaret Grey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Research on the translation of efficacious lifestyle change programs to prevent type 2 diabetes into community or clinical settings is needed. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the reach, implementation, and efficacy of a 6-month lifestyle program implemented in primary care by nurse practitioners (NPs) for adults at risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods: The NP sites (n = 4) were randomized to an enhanced standard care program (one NP and one nutrition session) or a lifestyle program (enhanced standard care and six NP sessions). These NPs recruited adults at risk of diabetes from their practice (n = 58), with an acceptance rate of 70%. Results: The program reached a diverse, obese, and moderately tow income sample. The NPs were able to successfully implement the protocols. The average length of the program was 9.3 months. Attendance was high (98%), and attrition was low (12%). The NPs were able to adopt the educational, behavioral, and psychosocial strategies of the intervention easily. Motivational interviewing was more difficult for NPs. Mixedmodel repeated-measures analysis indicated significant trends or improvement in both groups for nutrition and exercise behavior. Participants of the lifestyle program demonstrated trends for better high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and exercise behavior compared with the enhanced standard care participants. Twenty-five percent of lifestyle participants met treatment goals of 5% weight loss compared with 11 % of standard care participants. Discussion: A lifestyle program can be implemented in primary care by NPs, reach the targeted population, and be modestly successful. Further research is indicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-12
Number of pages11
JournalNursing Research
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Nurse Practitioners
Primary Health Care
Life Style
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Exercise
Motivational Interviewing
HDL Lipoproteins
Standard of Care
Research
Weight Loss

Keywords

  • Diabetes prevention
  • Nurse practitioner
  • Translation research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Translating the Diabetes Prevention Program to Primary Care A Pilot Study. / Whittemore, Robin; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Wagner, Julie; Dziura, James; Northrup, Veronika; Grey, Margaret.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 58, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 2-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whittemore, Robin ; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail ; Wagner, Julie ; Dziura, James ; Northrup, Veronika ; Grey, Margaret. / Translating the Diabetes Prevention Program to Primary Care A Pilot Study. In: Nursing Research. 2009 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 2-12.
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